Review: 'Larry 13:2'

Keagan left medical school after events that undermined his confidence in his ability to save lives; he has been using his clinical knowledge to perform abortions for women in need.

A man waits in a seedy motel room while the rain roars outside. Suddenly, someone bangs on the door. A tall woman in a blue poncho enters and tosses the gentleman an envelope full of money. That’s the opening sequence of Muwhahaha Productions' presentation of Tracy’s Hoida's 30-minute play, Larry 13:2.

What follows is a series of discoveries and confessions about these two characters, Keagan (Rory Sheridan) and Larry (Katie Mitchell), some of which are of an otherworldly nature. We learn Keagan left medical school after events that undermined his confidence in his ability to save lives; he has been using his clinical knowledge to perform abortions for women in need.

At first, the audience is led to believe that Larry is there to terminate a pregnancy. But we soon find out that she has come to Keagan for a different kind of surgical procedure, which will remain spoiler-free in this review.

Hoida’s script does a fair job of giving both characters their moments of having the upper hand. But the revelations often feel more bolted on than organic. Mitchell’s Larry hounds and pounds on Keagan with a merciless force; it would have been nice to experience a softer touch every now and then. Sheridan does a good job with the abrupt changes the script calls for, but isn’t always able to completely justify the sharper emotional turns.

Director Rebecca Bromels could have helped matters by giving each of her cast a few moments of tenderness, toward each other and themselves. There are places in the script that allow for it. However, as it is, they thunder too much — like the loud weather outside their rented room.


The CINCINNATI FRINGE FESTIVAL continues through June 11. Find CityBeat reviews of 41 early performances here. For a full schedule and more info about Fringe, visit cincyfringe.com.

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