Best Of 2017

Best and most important remaining vestige of Cincinnati’s rich musical heritage that is still endangered: King Records

Best and most important remaining vestige of Cincinnati’s rich musical heritage that is still endangered

The past year saw intensified efforts to save the physical remains of one of Cincinnati’s proudest cultural gems. James Brown. Bootsy Collins. Otis Redding. Ike Turner. Philip Paul. The list of local and national legends who recorded for Evanston-based King Records goes on and on, giving Cincinnati some serious credibility when it comes to the roots of America’s Rock, R&B, Soul and Funk music. What’s more, the company, started in 1943 by Cincinnatian Syd Nathan, was one of the country’s first integrated work places. King was decades ahead of its time and a continuingly pertinent example of what people can do when they transcend racial divides. Today, the label’s former headquarters is in disrepair and its owners want to tear it down. But the city has taken steps to purchase it, using eminent domain if necessary, so the facility can be turned into a museum and educational site. Decades after it closed down, King is still bringing people together.