January 22, 2020

19 Things To Do in Cincinnati This Week (Jan. 22-28)

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WEDNESDAY 22
ART: NOW That’s What I Call An Art Exhibit!
Seventy-two square canvases by Cincinnati-based artist and comedian Alex Leeds fill the walls of Over-the-Rhine’s MOTR Pub— one for every CD cover in the Now That’s What I Call Music! series. (The show is aptly titled NOW That’s What I Call An Art Exhibit!.) Exhibit runs through January. Free. MOTR Pub, 1345 Main St., Over-the-Rhine. motrpub.com.
Photo: Steve Kemple

WEDNESDAY 22

ART: NOW That’s What I Call An Art Exhibit!
Seventy-two square canvases by Cincinnati-based artist and comedian Alex Leeds fill the walls of Over-the-Rhine’s MOTR Pub— one for every CD cover in the Now That’s What I Call Music! series. (The show is aptly titled NOW That’s What I Call An Art Exhibit!.) Exhibit runs through January. Free. MOTR Pub, 1345 Main St., Over-the-Rhine. motrpub.com.
Photo: Steve Kemple
WEDNESDAY 22
MUSIC: Grace Potter at Taft Theatre
Grace Potter is reflective when she discusses the past five years of her personal and professional life, and you don't have to be psychic to discern the emotional roller coaster she's ridden in that span. Her 2015 solo album was titled Midnight, and her latest album is diametrically dubbed Daylight. 
8 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 22. $29.50-$49.50. Taft Theatre, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown, tafttheatre.org.
Photo: Pamela Neal

WEDNESDAY 22

MUSIC: Grace Potter at Taft Theatre
Grace Potter is reflective when she discusses the past five years of her personal and professional life, and you don't have to be psychic to discern the emotional roller coaster she's ridden in that span. Her 2015 solo album was titled Midnight, and her latest album is diametrically dubbed Daylight. 8 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 22. $29.50-$49.50. Taft Theatre, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown, tafttheatre.org.
Photo: Pamela Neal
WEDNESDAY 22
ONSTAGE: In the Night Time (Before the Sun Rises) at Know Theatre
We live in an age of unsurpassed existential dread. The ravaged environment, the unforgiving economy and the chances of nuclear war are grimly relevant topics that encircle us like hungry vultures. Our era’s sense of inherited doom makes it hard to believe that it’s kind to bring children into this world, but we reproduce all the same. That rationality sets the tone for In the Night Time (Before the Sun Rises), a two person play written by Nina Segal. Currently onstage at Know Theatre, it stars Elizabeth Chinn Molloy and Brandon Burton. 
Through Feb. 8. $25; $35 Living Wage ticket; $15 rush ticket (if available); $10 on Wednesdays. Know Theatre, 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, knowtheatre.com.
Photo: Dan R. Winters

WEDNESDAY 22

ONSTAGE: In the Night Time (Before the Sun Rises) at Know Theatre
We live in an age of unsurpassed existential dread. The ravaged environment, the unforgiving economy and the chances of nuclear war are grimly relevant topics that encircle us like hungry vultures. Our era’s sense of inherited doom makes it hard to believe that it’s kind to bring children into this world, but we reproduce all the same. That rationality sets the tone for In the Night Time (Before the Sun Rises), a two person play written by Nina Segal. Currently onstage at Know Theatre, it stars Elizabeth Chinn Molloy and Brandon Burton. Through Feb. 8. $25; $35 Living Wage ticket; $15 rush ticket (if available); $10 on Wednesdays. Know Theatre, 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, knowtheatre.com.
Photo: Dan R. Winters
WEDNESDAY 22
ART: Tom Schiff: Surrounded by Art at the Contemporary Arts Center
The Cincinnati-based photographer’s current solo show at the Contemporary Arts Center is a culmination of years spent traveling cross-country capturing the interiors and exteriors of various museums through the lens of a Cirkut, an antique “full rotation” panoramic camera. Through March 1.  Free admission. Contemporary Arts Center, 44 E. Sixth St., Downtown,  contemporaryartscenter.org.
Photo: Courtesy of the artist, Tom Schiff

WEDNESDAY 22

ART: Tom Schiff: Surrounded by Art at the Contemporary Arts Center
The Cincinnati-based photographer’s current solo show at the Contemporary Arts Center is a culmination of years spent traveling cross-country capturing the interiors and exteriors of various museums through the lens of a Cirkut, an antique “full rotation” panoramic camera. Through March 1. Free admission. Contemporary Arts Center, 44 E. Sixth St., Downtown, contemporaryartscenter.org.
Photo: Courtesy of the artist, Tom Schiff
THURSDAY 23
MUSIC: Mike Gordon at 20th Century Theater
Mike Gordon might well be one of the highest-profile bassists on the planet, due largely to his consistent role as the stringed half of Phish's rhythm section over the past 37 years (barring a two-year hiatus and a five year “break up”). In that time, Gordon has become renowned as a fluid and inventive bassist whose contributions to Phish (which early on included answering fan mail, booking gigs and managing the band's finances) have been critical to the band's success and longevity. He’s also turned that well-deserved reputation into an acclaimed solo career. 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23. $27.50 in advance; $30 day of show. 20th Century Theater, 3021 Madison Road, Oakley, the20thcenturytheatre.com.
Photo: Rene Humer

THURSDAY 23

MUSIC: Mike Gordon at 20th Century Theater
Mike Gordon might well be one of the highest-profile bassists on the planet, due largely to his consistent role as the stringed half of Phish's rhythm section over the past 37 years (barring a two-year hiatus and a five year “break up”). In that time, Gordon has become renowned as a fluid and inventive bassist whose contributions to Phish (which early on included answering fan mail, booking gigs and managing the band's finances) have been critical to the band's success and longevity. He’s also turned that well-deserved reputation into an acclaimed solo career. 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23. $27.50 in advance; $30 day of show. 20th Century Theater, 3021 Madison Road, Oakley, the20thcenturytheatre.com.
Photo: Rene Humer
THURSDAY 23
COMEDY: Gabe Kea
It’s already shaping up to be a big year for comedian Gabe Kea. He recently returned from Indianapolis, where he headlined a club and squeezed in a feature slot for Kevin Nealon. Back home in Cincinnati, he’s taking care of his daughter. “She’s in preschool, so most days I take her and pick her up,” he says. “I’m a house dad. I’ll be outside playing with my daughter and one of the neighbors will come by, and then another with her kids. And then there’s me. It’s all women and then me.” These shows at Go Bananas are going to be recorded for Kea’s first album — an exciting event made even better by the fact that he won’t be away from his daughter.  8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23; 7:30 and 10 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24 and Saturday, Jan. 25; 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26. $8-$14. Go Bananas Comedy Club, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com.
Photo: Provided

THURSDAY 23

COMEDY: Gabe Kea
It’s already shaping up to be a big year for comedian Gabe Kea. He recently returned from Indianapolis, where he headlined a club and squeezed in a feature slot for Kevin Nealon. Back home in Cincinnati, he’s taking care of his daughter. “She’s in preschool, so most days I take her and pick her up,” he says. “I’m a house dad. I’ll be outside playing with my daughter and one of the neighbors will come by, and then another with her kids. And then there’s me. It’s all women and then me.” These shows at Go Bananas are going to be recorded for Kea’s first album — an exciting event made even better by the fact that he won’t be away from his daughter. 8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23; 7:30 and 10 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24 and Saturday, Jan. 25; 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26. $8-$14. Go Bananas Comedy Club, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com.
Photo: Provided
THURSDAY 23
ONSTAGE: Cirque du Soleil AXEL
Want to up the ante on a typical high-flying, acrobatic Cirque du Soleil show? Put it on ice and add sharp, pointy skates. Cirque du Soleil AXEL blends ice skating with acrobatics and live takes on Rock and Pop hits to create an “adrenaline-fueled” adventure. Like most Cirque storylines, the plot of AXEL is slightly fantastic, described on the website as: “See sparks fly as Axel falls for the captivating Lei. Together they jet off on a fast-moving quest through fantastic and colorful worlds to retrieve the stolen light from the mystical Vi.” OK! Audiences can expect to see aerial and ladder balance acts, Wushu martial arts and people performing on a cyr wheel backdropped by bright projections and graphic art. Through Sunday, Jan. 26. $44-$130. Heritage Bank Center, 100 Broadway St., Downtown, heritagebankcenter.com.
Photo: Provided by Vehr Communications

THURSDAY 23

ONSTAGE: Cirque du Soleil AXEL
Want to up the ante on a typical high-flying, acrobatic Cirque du Soleil show? Put it on ice and add sharp, pointy skates. Cirque du Soleil AXEL blends ice skating with acrobatics and live takes on Rock and Pop hits to create an “adrenaline-fueled” adventure. Like most Cirque storylines, the plot of AXEL is slightly fantastic, described on the website as: “See sparks fly as Axel falls for the captivating Lei. Together they jet off on a fast-moving quest through fantastic and colorful worlds to retrieve the stolen light from the mystical Vi.” OK! Audiences can expect to see aerial and ladder balance acts, Wushu martial arts and people performing on a cyr wheel backdropped by bright projections and graphic art. Through Sunday, Jan. 26. $44-$130. Heritage Bank Center, 100 Broadway St., Downtown, heritagebankcenter.com.
Photo: Provided by Vehr Communications
THURSDAY 23
FILM: Mayerson JCC Jewish & Israeli Film Festival
Award-winning films from across the world converge for this month-long festival that celebrates both established and emerging filmmakers. Film screenings will be held through Feb. 27 at various venues across Greater Cincinnati. Opening night, Jan. 23, features 2018’s The Unorthodox. (Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at the Mayerson JCC.)  Directed by Eliran Malka, the film follows a man named Yakov Cohen. When his daughter is expelled from school because of her ethnic origins as a Sephardic Jew, he decides to form his own political group in Jerusalem — despite having no money, connections or experience. Based on a true story, these everyday people brought social change to Israel through their actions. Stick around for a discussion with Amnon Maggid, a Community Shaliach from Israel, and Justin Kirschner, associate director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, as they delve into what it’s like to vote in Israel. Other films that will be shown throughout the fest include Picture of His Life, Those Who Remained, Fiddler: A Miracle of Miracles, Aulcie, Family in Transition and more. Jan. 23-Feb. 27. Festival pass $140-$170; prices vary for individual film/event tickets. Multiple locations, mayersonjcc.org.
Photo: mayersonjcc.org

THURSDAY 23

FILM: Mayerson JCC Jewish & Israeli Film Festival
Award-winning films from across the world converge for this month-long festival that celebrates both established and emerging filmmakers. Film screenings will be held through Feb. 27 at various venues across Greater Cincinnati. Opening night, Jan. 23, features 2018’s The Unorthodox. (Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at the Mayerson JCC.) Directed by Eliran Malka, the film follows a man named Yakov Cohen. When his daughter is expelled from school because of her ethnic origins as a Sephardic Jew, he decides to form his own political group in Jerusalem — despite having no money, connections or experience. Based on a true story, these everyday people brought social change to Israel through their actions. Stick around for a discussion with Amnon Maggid, a Community Shaliach from Israel, and Justin Kirschner, associate director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, as they delve into what it’s like to vote in Israel. Other films that will be shown throughout the fest include Picture of His Life, Those Who Remained, Fiddler: A Miracle of Miracles, Aulcie, Family in Transition and more. Jan. 23-Feb. 27. Festival pass $140-$170; prices vary for individual film/event tickets. Multiple locations, mayersonjcc.org.
Photo: mayersonjcc.org
FRIDAY 24
MUSIC: Turkuaz at the Madison Theater
The Brooklyn-based Funk outfit Turkuaz plays the Madison Theater. 9:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24. $20 in advance; 22 day of show. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Covington, madisontheater.com.
Photo: Dani Brandwein

FRIDAY 24

MUSIC: Turkuaz at the Madison Theater
The Brooklyn-based Funk outfit Turkuaz plays the Madison Theater. 9:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24. $20 in advance; 22 day of show. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Covington, madisontheater.com.
Photo: Dani Brandwein
FRIDAY 24
FILM: The Apartment
If you’re under 70 years old, there’s a good chance you’ve never had the opportunity to watch Billy Wilder’s masterful The Apartment on the big screen. That changes this month as The Esquire hosts four screenings of the 1960 film, starring Jack Lemmon and Shirley MacLaine at her effervescent best. It feels weird to call The Apartment a “rom com,” but that’s fundamentally what it is — albeit with a prominent melancholic streak. In one of his finest roles — in which he plays his soulful if bumbling everyman character to perfection — Lemmon is C.C. “Bud” Baxter, whose success at an insurance company suddenly hinges on his discretion in regards to the indiscretions of managers at the office who begin to borrow Baxter’s apartment for liaisons with their mistresses. Things take a turn when it turns out one of the mistresses is also his big-time crush, elevator operator Fran Kubelik. That’s when things get really dark… then darkly sweet. The Esquire screening is a part of its series of Oscar-winning classics; The Apartment won Best Picture in 1961 and Wilder — just a year removed from another immortal classic, Some Like It Hot — took home the Best Director trophy, one of seven Oscars he’d earn in his lifetime. 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24; 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25; 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26; 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 27. $10.25. Esquire Theatre, 320 Ludlow Ave., Clifton, esquiretheatre.com.
Photo: YouTube Screenshot

FRIDAY 24

FILM: The Apartment
If you’re under 70 years old, there’s a good chance you’ve never had the opportunity to watch Billy Wilder’s masterful The Apartment on the big screen. That changes this month as The Esquire hosts four screenings of the 1960 film, starring Jack Lemmon and Shirley MacLaine at her effervescent best. It feels weird to call The Apartment a “rom com,” but that’s fundamentally what it is — albeit with a prominent melancholic streak. In one of his finest roles — in which he plays his soulful if bumbling everyman character to perfection — Lemmon is C.C. “Bud” Baxter, whose success at an insurance company suddenly hinges on his discretion in regards to the indiscretions of managers at the office who begin to borrow Baxter’s apartment for liaisons with their mistresses. Things take a turn when it turns out one of the mistresses is also his big-time crush, elevator operator Fran Kubelik. That’s when things get really dark… then darkly sweet. The Esquire screening is a part of its series of Oscar-winning classics; The Apartment won Best Picture in 1961 and Wilder — just a year removed from another immortal classic, Some Like It Hot — took home the Best Director trophy, one of seven Oscars he’d earn in his lifetime. 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24; 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25; 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26; 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 27. $10.25. Esquire Theatre, 320 Ludlow Ave., Clifton, esquiretheatre.com.
Photo: YouTube Screenshot