September 10, 2019

23 Things To Do in Cincinnati This Week (Sept. 11-17)

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WEDNESDAY 11
ONSTAGE: Fun Home 
Based on Alison Bechdel’s graphic tragicomic memoir, Fun Home was a surprise hit on Broadway in 2015, winning five Tony Awards, including best musical. Bechdel’s memoir, on which the show is based, is a memory piece exploring coming out as a lesbian as a young woman and learning that her father was a deeply closeted gay man. Bechdel’s father apparently died by suicide not long after she shared her own sexuality with her family. It gets its heartbreaking local premiere at Ensemble Theatre. Through Sept. 28. Tickets/more info: ensemblecincinnati.org.
Photo: Ryan Curtz

WEDNESDAY 11

ONSTAGE: Fun Home
Based on Alison Bechdel’s graphic tragicomic memoir, Fun Home was a surprise hit on Broadway in 2015, winning five Tony Awards, including best musical. Bechdel’s memoir, on which the show is based, is a memory piece exploring coming out as a lesbian as a young woman and learning that her father was a deeply closeted gay man. Bechdel’s father apparently died by suicide not long after she shared her own sexuality with her family. It gets its heartbreaking local premiere at Ensemble Theatre. Through Sept. 28. Tickets/more info: ensemblecincinnati.org.
Photo: Ryan Curtz
WEDNESDAY 11
MUSIC: Shonen Knife 
Japanese Punk Pop legends Shonen Knife began pumping out their gleeful brand of hyper-melodic/hyper-energetic Pop Rock in 1981. Influenced by the same artists as their American Punk Pop peers (The Ramones, Beach Boys, etc.), the group was one of the first Indie/Alternative Rock bands to break big outside of Japan. And Shonen Knife has maintained a loyal cult following in the years since, earning numerous TV, film and commercial song placements along the way to help pay the bills. Shonen Knife currently features founders (and sisters) Naoko Yamano (vocals/guitar) and Atsuko Yamano (bass/vocals), plus drummer Risa Kawano. Shonen Knife recently released its 19th album, Sweet Candy Power, on Buffalo, New York’s Good Charamel Records. 8 p.m. Wednesday. $17; $19 day of show. Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Newport, southgatehouse.com.
Photo: Tomoko Ota

WEDNESDAY 11

MUSIC: Shonen Knife
Japanese Punk Pop legends Shonen Knife began pumping out their gleeful brand of hyper-melodic/hyper-energetic Pop Rock in 1981. Influenced by the same artists as their American Punk Pop peers (The Ramones, Beach Boys, etc.), the group was one of the first Indie/Alternative Rock bands to break big outside of Japan. And Shonen Knife has maintained a loyal cult following in the years since, earning numerous TV, film and commercial song placements along the way to help pay the bills. Shonen Knife currently features founders (and sisters) Naoko Yamano (vocals/guitar) and Atsuko Yamano (bass/vocals), plus drummer Risa Kawano. Shonen Knife recently released its 19th album, Sweet Candy Power, on Buffalo, New York’s Good Charamel Records. 8 p.m. Wednesday. $17; $19 day of show. Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Newport, southgatehouse.com.
Photo: Tomoko Ota
WEDNESDAY 11
MUSIC: Morrissey  
Morrissey has long been one of the more polarizing figures in music. Beginning with his work with the influential British band The Smiths in the early ’80s, some music fans were put off by his mopey lyrics and swooning vocal moan, while many others, of course, were completely (sometimes obsessively) enamored with him. When the singer split off for a solo career in the late ’80s, he developed one of the most cultishly loyal fanbases in all of music, while also raising the ire of others for everything from his militant animal rights stance to his frequent concert cancelations. In the past couple of years, Morrissey has gained even more haters with his vocal support of conservative U.K. politicians, whom some accuse of being, at best, anti-immigrant and, at worst, racist. But Moz’s extensive body of work hasn’t somehow retroactively lost its importance to music and he certainly still has the respect of many of his peers and scores of younger artists. Performing in Kettering near Dayton this week with Interpol, Morrissey’s last show in Southwestern Ohio was in 2015, when he played Cincinnati’s Aronoff Center. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. $69-$119. Fraze Pavilion, 695 Lincoln Park Blvd., Kettering, fraze.com.
Photo: Sam Rayner

WEDNESDAY 11

MUSIC: Morrissey
Morrissey has long been one of the more polarizing figures in music. Beginning with his work with the influential British band The Smiths in the early ’80s, some music fans were put off by his mopey lyrics and swooning vocal moan, while many others, of course, were completely (sometimes obsessively) enamored with him. When the singer split off for a solo career in the late ’80s, he developed one of the most cultishly loyal fanbases in all of music, while also raising the ire of others for everything from his militant animal rights stance to his frequent concert cancelations. In the past couple of years, Morrissey has gained even more haters with his vocal support of conservative U.K. politicians, whom some accuse of being, at best, anti-immigrant and, at worst, racist. But Moz’s extensive body of work hasn’t somehow retroactively lost its importance to music and he certainly still has the respect of many of his peers and scores of younger artists. Performing in Kettering near Dayton this week with Interpol, Morrissey’s last show in Southwestern Ohio was in 2015, when he played Cincinnati’s Aronoff Center. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. $69-$119. Fraze Pavilion, 695 Lincoln Park Blvd., Kettering, fraze.com.
Photo: Sam Rayner
WEDNESDAY 11
MUSIC: Adam Ant 
Alternative music legend Adam Ant is performing his 1982 debut solo album Friend or Foe in full for the first time on his current tour. Ant rose to fame with his iconic eponymous-ish band Adam and the Ants, which formed during Punk’s formative years in the U.K. Ant was burned by Punk impresario Malcolm McLaren, who swiped the entire original Ants lineup to create Bow Wow Wow, but the singer bounced back with a renewed fervor, releasing his influential sophomore album, 1980’s Kings of the Wild Frontier, which introduced the band to the masses as leaders of the “New Romantic” sound, a swishy, swaggering brand of New Wave. The band would release just one more album — 1981’s Prince Charming (featuring the hit “Stand and Deliver”) — but remain one of the most memorable artists from the early U.K. Post Punk scene. Friend or Foe came out following the breakup of the Ants and featured the singles “Goody Two Shoes,” “Friend or Foe” and “Desperate But Not Serious.” It was Ant’s most successful solo album. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. $29.50-$55.50. Taft Theatre, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown, tafttheatre.org.
Photo: Chrome PR

WEDNESDAY 11

MUSIC: Adam Ant
Alternative music legend Adam Ant is performing his 1982 debut solo album Friend or Foe in full for the first time on his current tour. Ant rose to fame with his iconic eponymous-ish band Adam and the Ants, which formed during Punk’s formative years in the U.K. Ant was burned by Punk impresario Malcolm McLaren, who swiped the entire original Ants lineup to create Bow Wow Wow, but the singer bounced back with a renewed fervor, releasing his influential sophomore album, 1980’s Kings of the Wild Frontier, which introduced the band to the masses as leaders of the “New Romantic” sound, a swishy, swaggering brand of New Wave. The band would release just one more album — 1981’s Prince Charming (featuring the hit “Stand and Deliver”) — but remain one of the most memorable artists from the early U.K. Post Punk scene. Friend or Foe came out following the breakup of the Ants and featured the singles “Goody Two Shoes,” “Friend or Foe” and “Desperate But Not Serious.” It was Ant’s most successful solo album. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. $29.50-$55.50. Taft Theatre, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown, tafttheatre.org.
Photo: Chrome PR
WEDNESDAY 11
MUSIC: Snarky Puppy  
Progressive Jazz ensemble Snarky Puppy has built up a fervent fan base and a stack of glowing reviews thanks to its imaginative combination of Jazz, Rock, Funk, R&B and Pop. The legit “big band” (the group contains well over a dozen players, including a horn and string section) was formed by multi-instrumentalist Michael League in Texas in 2004 when he was a freshman at the University of North Texas. In 2014, Snarky Puppy won a Grammy for Best R&B Performance for its collaboration with singer Lalah Hathaway on the track “Something.” Since then, the collective won two more Grammys, both for Best Contemporary Instrumental Album. New album Immigrance finds Snarky Puppy’s hot streak continuing, with strong debuts on multiple charts and positive reviews from Rolling Stone and several other major outlets. 8 p.m. Wednesday. $40; $45 day of show. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Covington, madisontheater.com.
Photo: Stella K

WEDNESDAY 11

MUSIC: Snarky Puppy
Progressive Jazz ensemble Snarky Puppy has built up a fervent fan base and a stack of glowing reviews thanks to its imaginative combination of Jazz, Rock, Funk, R&B and Pop. The legit “big band” (the group contains well over a dozen players, including a horn and string section) was formed by multi-instrumentalist Michael League in Texas in 2004 when he was a freshman at the University of North Texas. In 2014, Snarky Puppy won a Grammy for Best R&B Performance for its collaboration with singer Lalah Hathaway on the track “Something.” Since then, the collective won two more Grammys, both for Best Contemporary Instrumental Album. New album Immigrance finds Snarky Puppy’s hot streak continuing, with strong debuts on multiple charts and positive reviews from Rolling Stone and several other major outlets. 8 p.m. Wednesday. $40; $45 day of show. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Covington, madisontheater.com.
Photo: Stella K
THURSDAY 12
ONSTAGE: August: Osage County 
Tracy Letts’ August: Osage County has already successfully solidified itself into the theatrical canon as a modern classic, acting as a poignant window into the violence — both physical and emotional — that family members can commit against one another. The Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s nearly three-and-a-half-hour production of Letts’ Pulitzer Prize-winning play bares it all. August: Osage County follows the tenuous reunion of the Weston family as they rally around matriarch, Violet, in the wake of their father Beverly’s disappearance. Though the play is certainly a devastating marathon of both familial and personal tragedy, there is a brutal and raw honesty to this modern portrayal of family life. It’s complex, emotional, painful and certainly never cut and dry. Though heavy on the darker aspects of life, it is incredibly moving in a way most plays or movies don’t spend the time to reach. Through Sept. 28. More info/tickets: cincyshakes.com.
Photo: Mikki Schaffner Photography

THURSDAY 12

ONSTAGE: August: Osage County
Tracy Letts’ August: Osage County has already successfully solidified itself into the theatrical canon as a modern classic, acting as a poignant window into the violence — both physical and emotional — that family members can commit against one another. The Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s nearly three-and-a-half-hour production of Letts’ Pulitzer Prize-winning play bares it all. August: Osage County follows the tenuous reunion of the Weston family as they rally around matriarch, Violet, in the wake of their father Beverly’s disappearance. Though the play is certainly a devastating marathon of both familial and personal tragedy, there is a brutal and raw honesty to this modern portrayal of family life. It’s complex, emotional, painful and certainly never cut and dry. Though heavy on the darker aspects of life, it is incredibly moving in a way most plays or movies don’t spend the time to reach. Through Sept. 28. More info/tickets: cincyshakes.com.
Photo: Mikki Schaffner Photography
THURSDAY 12
DANCE: Kaplan New Works Series 
The Cincinnati Ballet presents six world premiere works — three choreographed by company dancers and three from favorite female choreographers (Heather Britt, Andrea Schermoly and Sarah Van Patten) — in this innovative annual performance series. The pieces in the 14th Kaplan New Works Series are physical, imaginative, sometimes spiritual and touch on themes ranging from the passing of time and the act of grieving from “the other side of the death marker” to the human cycle of addiction, all interpreted through movement. Through Sept. 22. $29-$74. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cballet.org.
Photo: Cincinnati Ballet dancers who have choreographed works for the Kaplan New Works Series Hailey Bollinger

THURSDAY 12

DANCE: Kaplan New Works Series
The Cincinnati Ballet presents six world premiere works — three choreographed by company dancers and three from favorite female choreographers (Heather Britt, Andrea Schermoly and Sarah Van Patten) — in this innovative annual performance series. The pieces in the 14th Kaplan New Works Series are physical, imaginative, sometimes spiritual and touch on themes ranging from the passing of time and the act of grieving from “the other side of the death marker” to the human cycle of addiction, all interpreted through movement. Through Sept. 22. $29-$74. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cballet.org.
Photo: Cincinnati Ballet dancers who have choreographed works for the Kaplan New Works Series Hailey Bollinger
FRIDAY 13
MUSIC: Bad Suns 
Bad Suns has accomplished a great deal in their relatively short seven-year history. The quartet formed in Los Angeles in 2012, inspired and deeply influenced by the biggest Punk and Post Punk artists of the ’70s and ’80s, particularly the big C's: Elvis Costello, The Clash and The Cure. Bad Suns bring Post Punk to the 20th Century Theater. 7 p.m. doors. $20 advance; $22 day of. 3021 Madison Road, Oakley, the20thcenturytheatre.com.
Photo: Rowan Daly

FRIDAY 13

MUSIC: Bad Suns
Bad Suns has accomplished a great deal in their relatively short seven-year history. The quartet formed in Los Angeles in 2012, inspired and deeply influenced by the biggest Punk and Post Punk artists of the ’70s and ’80s, particularly the big C's: Elvis Costello, The Clash and The Cure. Bad Suns bring Post Punk to the 20th Century Theater. 7 p.m. doors. $20 advance; $22 day of. 3021 Madison Road, Oakley, the20thcenturytheatre.com.
Photo: Rowan Daly
FRIDAY 13
MUSIC: Sebastian Bach  
In 1989, New Jersey rockers Skid Row released its self-titled debut album. Skid Row was a hit almost immediately, spawning the group's biggest hits, "18 and Life" and "I Remember You." The band's wild-eyed frontman Sebastian Bach — who, in his reality-show heyday, introduced the word "mothertruckers" to the lexicon — is hitting the road this fall for an extensive 30th-anniversary  tour on which he will be performing Skid Row's breakthrough debut in full (minus the other members of the original band and plus his own backing crew). 6 p.m. Friday. Currently sold out. Blue Note Harrison, 9660 Dry Fork Road, Harrison.
Photo: Enzo Mazzeo

FRIDAY 13

MUSIC: Sebastian Bach
In 1989, New Jersey rockers Skid Row released its self-titled debut album. Skid Row was a hit almost immediately, spawning the group's biggest hits, "18 and Life" and "I Remember You." The band's wild-eyed frontman Sebastian Bach — who, in his reality-show heyday, introduced the word "mothertruckers" to the lexicon — is hitting the road this fall for an extensive 30th-anniversary tour on which he will be performing Skid Row's breakthrough debut in full (minus the other members of the original band and plus his own backing crew). 6 p.m. Friday. Currently sold out. Blue Note Harrison, 9660 Dry Fork Road, Harrison.
Photo: Enzo Mazzeo
FRIDAY 13
CLASSICAL: Renée Elise Goldsberry with the Cincinnati Pops 
Tony Award winner Renée Elise Goldsberry — perhaps best known as Angelica Schuyler, who she portrayed in the smash-hit Hamilton — will lend her voice to Pop, Soul and Broadway favorites, joined by the Cincinnati Pops. With John Morris Russell as conductor, this marks Goldsberry’s first performance in the Queen City. “I call it a celebration of love. I put together a lot of songs people know and love: Pop songs, spiritual songs, Jazz songs,” Goldsberry says. She adds that the second half of the show features songs she’s known for from Broadway. Aside from her role as Angelica, her credits include Nettie Harris in The Color Purple, Mimi Márquez in Rent and Nala in The Lion King. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets start at $25. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org.
Photo: Provided by the Cincinnati Pops

FRIDAY 13

CLASSICAL: Renée Elise Goldsberry with the Cincinnati Pops
Tony Award winner Renée Elise Goldsberry — perhaps best known as Angelica Schuyler, who she portrayed in the smash-hit Hamilton — will lend her voice to Pop, Soul and Broadway favorites, joined by the Cincinnati Pops. With John Morris Russell as conductor, this marks Goldsberry’s first performance in the Queen City. “I call it a celebration of love. I put together a lot of songs people know and love: Pop songs, spiritual songs, Jazz songs,” Goldsberry says. She adds that the second half of the show features songs she’s known for from Broadway. Aside from her role as Angelica, her credits include Nettie Harris in The Color Purple, Mimi Márquez in Rent and Nala in The Lion King. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets start at $25. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org.
Photo: Provided by the Cincinnati Pops