September 28, 2018

27 Cincinnati Brunch Restaurants Worth Getting Out Of Bed For

These days, the phrase “Let’s get brunch” is basically a euphemism for “Let’s get drunk before noon.” People be lovin' brunch, amiright? It’s a Bacchanalian breakfast celebration that doubles as an excuse to mainline mimosas and stuff bacon into foods where it does not belong. The brunch zeitgeist of the new millennium is real. There are mood boards dedicated to what to wear to brunch, restaurants with strictly brunch menus and brunch-only Instagram feeds (@bitcheswhobrunch, @brunchboys). Why do Americans love a meal that doubles as breakfast and lunch and basically turns into an ongoing commitment to day drinking? Is it part of the self-care indulgence movement? A genius marketing campaign by egg companies or the avocado illuminati? Whatever the reason, our country is literally obsessed with brunch, so CityBeat dining writers made a list of their favorite places to drink and dine on the weekends for all types of moods. Whether you want to get sloppy drunk in your atheleisurewear, have a fancy family outing or dip into some dim sum, we’ve got you covered.

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Taste of Belgium
Multiple Locations
Taste of Belgium has been expanding its operations since its first waffle was pulled from a cast iron waffle-press at Findlay Market in 2007, opening four brick-and-mortar bistros and an additional market location. Along with its locally famous sweet, sturdy and caramelized Belgian waffles, the brunch offerings have piloted the restaurant’s rapid ascent. Under the “Brunch Like a Belgian” menu category, there is a fresh berry parfait with chia seeds; a McWaffle with egg, bacon, gruyere and maple syrup; and a messy goetta hash, with Eckerlin Meats’ goetta and two eggs. This is in addition to staples like a strawberries-and-cream-topped waffle or a savory buckwheat galette. Try the crepe-like galette filled with turkey, bacon and housemade ranch dressing or Speculoos biscuits and cookie butter. 
Photo: Brittany Thornton

Taste of Belgium

Multiple Locations
Taste of Belgium has been expanding its operations since its first waffle was pulled from a cast iron waffle-press at Findlay Market in 2007, opening four brick-and-mortar bistros and an additional market location. Along with its locally famous sweet, sturdy and caramelized Belgian waffles, the brunch offerings have piloted the restaurant’s rapid ascent. Under the “Brunch Like a Belgian” menu category, there is a fresh berry parfait with chia seeds; a McWaffle with egg, bacon, gruyere and maple syrup; and a messy goetta hash, with Eckerlin Meats’ goetta and two eggs. This is in addition to staples like a strawberries-and-cream-topped waffle or a savory buckwheat galette. Try the crepe-like galette filled with turkey, bacon and housemade ranch dressing or Speculoos biscuits and cookie butter.
Photo: Brittany Thornton
Northside Yacht Club
4231 Spring Grove Ave., Northside
It’s never too early for Punk Rock brunch at Northside Yacht Club — as long as it’s after 11 a.m. Known to many patrons as a spot to catch cool touring bands late at night, NSYC has continually proven itself to have a quality kitchen staff that provides excellent food no matter what time the clock says. It’s not unusual to hear The Buzzcocks on the speaker while you study the massive beer cooler for your order. If you decide on their bloody mary, know it contains enough food to count as an entrée to some appetites, including a pulled pork sandwich, bacon, a chicken wing and — oh, yeah — celery. Have you checked out their rad new patio tables? Good for groups.
Photo: Sean Peters

Northside Yacht Club

4231 Spring Grove Ave., Northside
It’s never too early for Punk Rock brunch at Northside Yacht Club — as long as it’s after 11 a.m. Known to many patrons as a spot to catch cool touring bands late at night, NSYC has continually proven itself to have a quality kitchen staff that provides excellent food no matter what time the clock says. It’s not unusual to hear The Buzzcocks on the speaker while you study the massive beer cooler for your order. If you decide on their bloody mary, know it contains enough food to count as an entrée to some appetites, including a pulled pork sandwich, bacon, a chicken wing and — oh, yeah — celery. Have you checked out their rad new patio tables? Good for groups.
Photo: Sean Peters
Sugar n’ Spice
4381 Reading Road, Paddock Hills
For over 75 years, this family-friendly Paddock Hills diner has been serving up “Wispy Thin” pancakes, breakfast sandwiches, steak and eggs, corned beef hash, breakfast quesadillas and much more to one of the most diverse clienteles in town. From the after-church crowds to college students to doctors heading off to work at nearby hospitals, folks from all over the economic spectrum continue to start their day at this cozy counter or crammed into the precious few booths. And little has changed since Mort Walker founded Sugar n’ Spice in 1941. Wait time is often long for the popular spot, but Steven Frankel, fifth owner of the landmark restaurant and self-proclaimed “caretaker of an historic icon,” soothes hangry patrons by passing out nuggets of fried macaroni and cheese as well as gooey chocolate brownies. When those coveted seats finally come available, Frankel rewards younger diners with rubber duckies in addition to their meals. 
Photo: Jesse Fox

Sugar n’ Spice

4381 Reading Road, Paddock Hills
For over 75 years, this family-friendly Paddock Hills diner has been serving up “Wispy Thin” pancakes, breakfast sandwiches, steak and eggs, corned beef hash, breakfast quesadillas and much more to one of the most diverse clienteles in town. From the after-church crowds to college students to doctors heading off to work at nearby hospitals, folks from all over the economic spectrum continue to start their day at this cozy counter or crammed into the precious few booths. And little has changed since Mort Walker founded Sugar n’ Spice in 1941. Wait time is often long for the popular spot, but Steven Frankel, fifth owner of the landmark restaurant and self-proclaimed “caretaker of an historic icon,” soothes hangry patrons by passing out nuggets of fried macaroni and cheese as well as gooey chocolate brownies. When those coveted seats finally come available, Frankel rewards younger diners with rubber duckies in addition to their meals.
Photo: Jesse Fox
Otto’s
521 Main St., Covington
Serving American home cooking with a flair of haute couture, Otto’s is a strong brunch spot in Covington. The restaurant fills up quickly — even though the interior maximizes its seating capacity in such a way that Tetris gamers would approve of — so it would behoove you to make a reservation. Really, it’s worth the extra effort. The décor alludes to a passion for circus performers and includes a collection of antique seltzer bottles associated with clowns' water shenanigans, but Otto’s isn’t kidding around in the kitchen. By taking a simple Southern treat like fried green tomatoes and introducing them to a BLT croissant sandwich, Otto’s made the B.L.F.G.T. — though an “E” should be added to the acronym because there’s also an egg in there.
Photo via Facebook.com/Ottos

Otto’s

521 Main St., Covington
Serving American home cooking with a flair of haute couture, Otto’s is a strong brunch spot in Covington. The restaurant fills up quickly — even though the interior maximizes its seating capacity in such a way that Tetris gamers would approve of — so it would behoove you to make a reservation. Really, it’s worth the extra effort. The décor alludes to a passion for circus performers and includes a collection of antique seltzer bottles associated with clowns' water shenanigans, but Otto’s isn’t kidding around in the kitchen. By taking a simple Southern treat like fried green tomatoes and introducing them to a BLT croissant sandwich, Otto’s made the B.L.F.G.T. — though an “E” should be added to the acronym because there’s also an egg in there.
Photo via Facebook.com/Ottos
Greyhound Tavern
2500 Dixie Hwy, Fort Mitchell
The Greyhound Tavern has offered down-home comfort food to Northern Kentuckians since the 1920s. The atmosphere is pleasantly country-fied, with wood paneling, vinyl tablecloths and multiple fireplaces, and so is the menu. The tavern is known for its herbed secret-recipe fried chicken, available daily with family-style specials on Mondays and Tuesdays and a starring role on the Sunday brunch buffet, which also features a carving station, casseroles, goetta, biscuits, mashed potatoes and other hearty fare. The Greyhound’s Saturday non-buffet brunch menu is more streamlined, with a focus on house favorites (chicken livers, fried green tomatoes), breakfast items, salads and sandwiches, plus a nice menu of cocktails: a Kentucky sunrise with Bulleit bourbon and orange juice, a pitcher of mimosas or bellinis, spiked coffee and a bloody mary with garnishes like pickled asparagus and bacon.
Photo: Zachary Petit

Greyhound Tavern

2500 Dixie Hwy, Fort Mitchell
The Greyhound Tavern has offered down-home comfort food to Northern Kentuckians since the 1920s. The atmosphere is pleasantly country-fied, with wood paneling, vinyl tablecloths and multiple fireplaces, and so is the menu. The tavern is known for its herbed secret-recipe fried chicken, available daily with family-style specials on Mondays and Tuesdays and a starring role on the Sunday brunch buffet, which also features a carving station, casseroles, goetta, biscuits, mashed potatoes and other hearty fare. The Greyhound’s Saturday non-buffet brunch menu is more streamlined, with a focus on house favorites (chicken livers, fried green tomatoes), breakfast items, salads and sandwiches, plus a nice menu of cocktails: a Kentucky sunrise with Bulleit bourbon and orange juice, a pitcher of mimosas or bellinis, spiked coffee and a bloody mary with garnishes like pickled asparagus and bacon.
Photo: Zachary Petit
The Littlefield
3934 Spring Grove Ave., Northside
Northside is lucky to have The Littlefield. The restaurant has claimed its place in the neighborhood as a solid destination for both date night and brunch. One of the benefits to the restaurant’s location is its immediate proximity to Arcade Legacy: Bar Edition, which is the perfect holdover zone for diners waiting on available tables. The kitchen consistently delivers exemplary dishes, while the bar offers a very good variety of quality drinks to suit all palates. The most instagrammable drink is likely their Fleur de Bee, which contains a hibiscus flower everyone loves to photograph themselves munching.
Photo via Facebook.com/TheLittlefieldNorthside

The Littlefield

3934 Spring Grove Ave., Northside
Northside is lucky to have The Littlefield. The restaurant has claimed its place in the neighborhood as a solid destination for both date night and brunch. One of the benefits to the restaurant’s location is its immediate proximity to Arcade Legacy: Bar Edition, which is the perfect holdover zone for diners waiting on available tables. The kitchen consistently delivers exemplary dishes, while the bar offers a very good variety of quality drinks to suit all palates. The most instagrammable drink is likely their Fleur de Bee, which contains a hibiscus flower everyone loves to photograph themselves munching.
Photo via Facebook.com/TheLittlefieldNorthside