Morning News & Stuff

Sittenfeld suffers scare, group offers recommendations for reducing violent crime, Trump and Clinton get through N.Y.

click to enlarge GOP presidential primary frontrunner Donald Trump stands with security personnel at a March 13 campaign rally in West Chester.
GOP presidential primary frontrunner Donald Trump stands with security personnel at a March 13 campaign rally in West Chester.

City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld suffered a scare yesterday when he collapsed during a press conference at City Hall. Medics quickly tended to the councilman and former Senate candidate, who later said he was simply overheated and had low blood sugar.

Sittenfeld said he’ll get the A/C pumped up at City Hall and will be fine.


The incident occurred toward the end of a press conference to announce a new city-wide initiative intended to combat sexual assault on campus.


• On Monday, a group working on recommendations for the city to help combat violent crime announced its findings to a City Council committee.


Spearheaded by City Councilwoman Yvette Simpson, the Violence Prevention Working Group was created in late 2014 when Council cut $400,000 from the city’s Human Services Fund dedicated to violence prevention. The group has been working with neighborhoods and nonprofits to determine effective paths forward.


Participants suggested looking at violent crime as a public health problem and performing a sort of intervention for children who are sometimes being shaped by adults involved in violence.

Working group members from the Cincinnati Health Department, the Cincinnati Police Department and local nonprofit the GLAD House recommended that the city provide $500,000 toward violence prevention to be matched with $250,000 in private funding, appoint a representative from CPD to the Human Services Advisory Council and support the appointment of one organization to serve as the backbone of the plan.

CityBeat covered the announcement in more detail here.


• Walnut Hills High School and Wyoming High School ranked first and second, respectively, in U.S. News and World Report’s latest Ohio high school rankings. Cincinnati in total has five of the top 10 Ohio schools, while Northern Kentucky has four of the top 10 in that state. 


• In bad school news, Miami University suspended two fraternities for hazing. Miami reportedly investigated 21 hazing allegations in February at 12 sororities and fraternities. Bad college kids.  


• Local air quality is pretty bad, but it’s improving according to an annual air quality report by the American Lung Association.


• Cincinnati parking meter revenues are up, which is a common occurrence after raising rates and increasing hours of enforcement. Assistant City Manager John Juech says the city is gleaning a lot of information from the newer smart meters, such as where people park a lot and where they don’t. Revenues are up 60 percent, the city says.


• Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton won their home state primaries in New York yesterday. You don’t have to be a delegate math wizard to realize America is one big step closer to a Clinton-Trump presidential race, but here’s the requisite note from the Washington Post.

Trump’s victory puts him closer to clinching the GOP nomination and should at least temporarily quell speculation that he will fall short of the votes needed before the July convention.


Clinton held a comfortable lead throughout the campaign and her victory makes it near-mathematically impossible for Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.) to overtake her lead in the race for convention delegates.

But is Trump’s jet still registered to fly?


• Vox explains why 4/20 is national weed day. One theory involves high school students getting high every day at 4:20 p.m. and then using 4/20 as a code word. Stoners are extremely creative.


• The Reds played a team with a dumb name from Colorado last night, beating the Mountains 4-3 and stealing five bases in a single inning.