Morning News and Stuff

Park Board gives endowment perks to top executives; Local media looks at Denver for what could be in Cincy; Five beers coming in celebration of streetcar

click to enlarge Taft's Ale House
Taft's Ale House

Good morning, everyone! Here are your morning headlines. 

• The Cincinnati Park Board is using private endowments donated to the board nine years ago by a private individual to give its top executives some pretty sweet perks. Records obtained by The Enquirer show that executive director Willie Carden is given a car allowance of $12,000 a year from the funds, with second top-ranking official Marijane Klug raking in $4,800 a year for her set of wheels. The endowment, which was previously used to pay the board's top executive more than $100,000 in annual bonuses, also paid $48,500 of Carden's credit card expenses for the last three years, covered his membership to a private, exclusive club and covered thousands in food there and paid $21,000 in legal expenses of nonprofit the Cincinnati Parks Foundation after an ethics investigation into Carden and Klug. Mayor John Cranley, who is in the middle of pushing for a permanent income tax levy for city parks, has approved a temporary moratorium on any discretionary spending and called for a third-party audit of the park board early last week. City Manager Harry Black released a memo Friday saying the audit is underway at the expense of the park board. 
• One of Cranley's proposed multimillion park projects is a set of trails that would go through the city's east and west sides. WCPO has turned to Colorado — Denver specifically — to ask if these trails could transform Cincinnati. Real estate experts in the Mile High City say residents' ability to ditch their cars and hike and bike everywhere has attracted considerable interest. But the report finds that while many, including myself, would like to bike to work without the daily threat of being knocked off the road by a passing vehicle, some believe there is a way to build these Denver-style trails without Cranley's permanent tax levy. 
Denver is apparently becoming the model city for what Cincinnati could be. The Enquirer recently sent two reporters to check out just what a city that has legalized marijuana looks like. Unlike WCPO, which saw sprawling urban bike trails, The Enquirer wrote about what they didn't see, which included: "staggering stoners on city streets," that skunky weed smell and impaired drivers. So Denver doesn't look like my freshman dorm hall, and Cincinnati probably won't either if voters pass Issue 3. But the bigger issue behind Ohio's ballot initiative still lies in that pesky rule that would limit the growth of marijuana to 10 commercial farms — a rule which is also something Colorado does not have. 
• Rep. Alicia Reece (D-Bond Hill) and Rep. Jonathan Dever (R-Madeira) have introduced a bill that would require outsider law enforcement to investigate police-involved shootings. The bill would require a panel of three officers — one from the police agency and two from a pool of investigators across the state — to look into the death and produce a report. This bill comes in response to the July shooting of Mount Auburn resident Sam DuBose by University of Cincinnati Police Officer Ray Tensing as the department failed to investigate its own officer, according to Reece. 
• One of the most confusing things for people new to Cincinnati, like myself, is the question "Where did you go to school?" I quickly found out that Cincinnatians mean high school, not college, and it is a question that I'm pretty sure no one has asked me in 10 years and is irrelevant to locals because I went to high school really far from here. Well, Mary Stagaman, executive director of the Agenda 360 plan at the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, would like to put an end to the common inquiry. She thinks the question is unwelcoming to outsiders, even though it shows most people here are incredibly tied to the community. The agency is developing a leadership program in cultural competency as part of Diverse by Design, a movement to bring more diversity to the area, to be launched in 2016 to make the region more friendly to outsiders. 
• Does the arrival of the streetcar make you want to drink? Well, five Cincinnati brewers are making beers especially for you. Taft's Ale House, Christian Moerlein Lager House, Christian Moerlein Malt House Taproom, Rhinegeist and Rock Bottom Brewery will all be cranking out new brews set to debut on the projected arrival dates of the streetcars with the first one, a Rye India Pale Ale called Ryed the Rails, debuting at Taft's this Friday. 

• Finally, you might want to watch the number of sausages you wash down with those streetcar beers. A report by the World Health Organization has linked some types of cancer to eating red or processed meat. The report found that eating beef, pork or lamb could cause colon, pancreatic and prostate cancer after a review of more than 800 studies.

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