September 30, 2019

Inside Cincinnati Museum Center's Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission Exhibition

The Cincinnati Museum Center opened their newest exhibit, Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission, on Sept. 28.  The exhibition celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing and features the Command Module Columbia, the only portion of the spacecraft that survived the journey. It's the first time since 1976 that the module has been on display outside the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Visitors can also catch a glimpse of Buzz Aldrin’s gold-plated extravehicular helmet visor and thermal-insulated gloves. the star chart that helped guide Aldrin, Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins on their travels and more. Fun fact: Armstrong was born a Buckeye and later taught at the University of Cincinnati.
Photos by Mitchell Parton
Scroll down to view images

Join the CityBeat Press Club

At a time when local-based reporting is critical, support from our readers is essential to our future. Support our coverage with a one-time or monthly donation.


The Command Module Columbia was the only part of the Apollo 11 spacecraft to return to Earth. It served as living quarters for astronauts Neil Armstong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins.
Mitchell Parton
The Command Module Columbia was the only part of the Apollo 11 spacecraft to return to Earth. It served as living quarters for astronauts Neil Armstong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins.
Ahead of the exhibition's opening, the Cincinnati Museum Center held a special ribbon-cutting ceremony.
Mitchell Parton
Ahead of the exhibition's opening, the Cincinnati Museum Center held a special ribbon-cutting ceremony.
The entrance to "Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission" exhibition.
Mitchell Parton
The entrance to "Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission" exhibition.
The late James E. Webb served as NASA's second administrator from 1961 to 1968. He oversaw the first manned launches — Mercury through Gemini — and left just before the Apollo 11 mission.
Mitchell Parton
The late James E. Webb served as NASA's second administrator from 1961 to 1968. He oversaw the first manned launches — Mercury through Gemini — and left just before the Apollo 11 mission.
One of two rucksacks filled with equipment — including three water containers, a radio beacon and spare battery, three pairs of sunglasses, six packages of desalting chemicals, a seawater desalter kit, two survival lights, a machete and two bottles of sunscreen — that would help the Apollo 11 crew survive for up to 48 hours in the case of an emergency landing on Earth.
Mitchell Parton
One of two rucksacks filled with equipment — including three water containers, a radio beacon and spare battery, three pairs of sunglasses, six packages of desalting chemicals, a seawater desalter kit, two survival lights, a machete and two bottles of sunscreen — that would help the Apollo 11 crew survive for up to 48 hours in the case of an emergency landing on Earth.
A close-up of the Command Module Columbia.
Mitchell Parton
A close-up of the Command Module Columbia.
The square side windows on Columbia allowed the crew to photograph otherworldly landscapes while in space, including the Moon, Earth and the Apollo Lunar Module, the part of the spacecraft in which Aldrin and Armstrong descended to the Moon.
Mitchell Parton
The square side windows on Columbia allowed the crew to photograph otherworldly landscapes while in space, including the Moon, Earth and the Apollo Lunar Module, the part of the spacecraft in which Aldrin and Armstrong descended to the Moon.
A view of Columbia's backside.
Mitchell Parton
A view of Columbia's backside.
A to-scale miniature replica of Columbia.
Mitchell Parton
A to-scale miniature replica of Columbia.
Inside Cincinnati Museum Center's Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission Exhibition
Mitchell Parton