Inside the Eclectic Columbia Tusculum Home of Artist Pam Kravetz and Engineer Craig Davis

Names: Pam Kravetz and Craig Davis

Occupations: Pam is an artist, parade leader, wig wearer and educator/art teacher at Harrison High School; Craig is an engineer for Ethicon

Neighborhood: Columbia Tusculum

Time lived in: 11 years

Pam Kravetz and Craig Davis moved to Columbia Tusculum — Cincinnati's oldest neighborhood — 11 years ago.

"We were looking everywhere — I had a cute little house in Silverton and he had a cute little house in Ridgewood — so we started looking in that direction, out in Pleasant Ridge, which we love," says Pam, a lifelong Cincinnatian. "Then we decided, we’re starting this life together and we should just change everything, just really make it as different as we can."

They purchased their 1895 three-bedroom, one-and-a-half-bath common-wall home (they share an interior wall with their neighbor) when they got married, and renovated the historic house to incorporate both of their tastes. " I loved the idea of something old kind of coming back to life," Pam says.

Craig, originally from Toledo, is an engineer and athlete — he runs, mountain bikes, kayaks and cross-country skis in Alaska — and Pam is an artist, creative and fixture at Cincinnati's most entertaining events. The two had help from friends, including designer Leah Spurrier of HighStreet and architect Eric Puryear, to create an eclectic yet harmonious living space that blended both of their personalities.

"We’re both pretty chill, believe it or not," Pam says. "I might not look like I am, but I am... sometimes. But I just wanted to make sure that there was equity in it. We really tried to make sure each of us was honored in the place."

What they have now is a warm, open-concept space that's perfect for entertaining and being entertained: Pam exhibits both her artwork and the artwork of other Cincinnatians on every available surface. They couple's children — Craig's two daughters, Jill and Erin, and Pam's son, Max — are grown and out of the house but everyone is welcome. The spare bedrooms can be quickly converted from studio or office space back into sleeping quarters for visitors. 

"We love to have people over," Pam says. "Like everything I do, I feel like it’s incredibly performative so there’s almost like a story that I want to tell when I have people over. Craig is so great because he enjoys that, too. I wanted a space that was big and welcoming and open."

"You have to go home and feel like it’s your space, your sanctuary," Pam continues. "And that’s true if you’re in an apartment or condo; wherever you’re living, you can make it into your own private sanctuary. I have a girlfriend with a beautiful all-white house — everything is white and it just feels so pristine and so calming and meditative. And then I know you walk into my house and it's like 'boom boom boom' — it's like the marching band just walked over your head. You just have to be true to yourself and take chances. And everything is changeable. Make it so you smile when you come home."

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Pam Kravetz and her husband Craig Davis at home in their kitchen in Columbia Tusculum
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Pam Kravetz and her husband Craig Davis at home in their kitchen in Columbia Tusculum
"We’ve been in the house for 11 years. My husband and I bought it when we got married and renovated it. ...We had adorable homes separately, and when we got married, we married our homes as well," Pam says.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
"We’ve been in the house for 11 years. My husband and I bought it when we got married and renovated it. ...We had adorable homes separately, and when we got married, we married our homes as well," Pam says.
"Our styles are so completely different — he’s very much into nature and earth tones and I'm very much into Pop color — so we decided we should have a space that belongs to both of us," Pam says.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
"Our styles are so completely different — he’s very much into nature and earth tones and I'm very much into Pop color — so we decided we should have a space that belongs to both of us," Pam says.
"My favorite part of the house is, I love walking into the shotgun. I love the high ceilings and the long (space). It’s almost like everything is one big room. I really love that. I think too because I’m so social — I love to be out all the time, I love to be in crowds and I love to be in the center of a crowd if anybody wants me to — and it’s really nice to come home and it being this big open space," Pam says.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
"My favorite part of the house is, I love walking into the shotgun. I love the high ceilings and the long (space). It’s almost like everything is one big room. I really love that. I think too because I’m so social — I love to be out all the time, I love to be in crowds and I love to be in the center of a crowd if anybody wants me to — and it’s really nice to come home and it being this big open space," Pam says.
"We’re both pretty strong in our aesthetic so my friend Leah Spurrier from HighStreet, we hired her to come in and check the space out to (figure out) how do we make this so it’s not one or the other and she did that beautifully," Pam says.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
"We’re both pretty strong in our aesthetic so my friend Leah Spurrier from HighStreet, we hired her to come in and check the space out to (figure out) how do we make this so it’s not one or the other and she did that beautifully," Pam says.
"I mosaic-tiled the fireplace. That was the first thing I did when we moved in to kind of say this is ours and our space. It says, 'Pam loves Craig,' " Pam says.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
"I mosaic-tiled the fireplace. That was the first thing I did when we moved in to kind of say this is ours and our space. It says, 'Pam loves Craig,' " Pam says.
The family portrait dolls on the wall are by local artist Jen Edwards. They were made as part of a stop-motion animation art project. "They’re bendable and moveable and they’re just hilarious," Pam says. "It’s just so funny the interpretation Jen did of all of us. I actually have other clothes. I’m almost like a 
Barbie doll because I have other outfits to change into."
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
The family portrait dolls on the wall are by local artist Jen Edwards. They were made as part of a stop-motion animation art project. "They’re bendable and moveable and they’re just hilarious," Pam says. "It’s just so funny the interpretation Jen did of all of us. I actually have other clothes. I’m almost like a Barbie doll because I have other outfits to change into."
"All of our kids are grown and out of the house," Pam says. "We knew this when we bought the house so we wanted to make the spaces convertible so when they came home or we had visitors, we could make it into a bedroom or use it for other things, like studio for me or office for Craig."
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
"All of our kids are grown and out of the house," Pam says. "We knew this when we bought the house so we wanted to make the spaces convertible so when they came home or we had visitors, we could make it into a bedroom or use it for other things, like studio for me or office for Craig."
A Murphy bed pulls down from the wall to accommodate guests. In the closet behind the faux fur coat is Pam's collection of fake furs, sparkles and sequins. "Craig is so good," Pam says. "He organizes stuff for me because I'm all over that place." Above the bed is Max's collection of paintings by local outsider artist Tony Dotson, which he started buying when he was 6-years-old.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
A Murphy bed pulls down from the wall to accommodate guests. In the closet behind the faux fur coat is Pam's collection of fake furs, sparkles and sequins. "Craig is so good," Pam says. "He organizes stuff for me because I'm all over that place." Above the bed is Max's collection of paintings by local outsider artist Tony Dotson, which he started buying when he was 6-years-old.
This wall of art includes a portrait of Pam (upper left) by Cincinnati artist Brian Joiner and a watercolor work of Pam and Craig on their wedding day by graphic novelist David Mack. "I love that it’s almost like a gallery of Cincinnati artists that I love and adore," says Pam of her space. "So every day I come home and I see artwork by people I love and that also makes me super happy." The cowboy boots are gifts from Craig.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
This wall of art includes a portrait of Pam (upper left) by Cincinnati artist Brian Joiner and a watercolor work of Pam and Craig on their wedding day by graphic novelist David Mack. "I love that it’s almost like a gallery of Cincinnati artists that I love and adore," says Pam of her space. "So every day I come home and I see artwork by people I love and that also makes me super happy." The cowboy boots are gifts from Craig.