October 19, 2021

The 25 Most Haunted Places in Ohio to Visit This Halloween Season

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Get Creepy at the Sedamsville Rectory
639 Steiner Ave., Sedamsville
Get out your EMFs and your holy water. The rectory, which is the one of four buildings that once belonged to the Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, is said to be haunted by an evil spirit. The exterior of the building is made up of red brick and windows and the porch juts out on the side. The inside of the building’s hallways look a little too much like a horror movie for comfort. If you’re still skeptical, the rectory gained the attention of the Travel Channel's Ghost Adventures.
Photo: Erin Gardner

Get Creepy at the Sedamsville Rectory

639 Steiner Ave., Sedamsville
Get out your EMFs and your holy water. The rectory, which is the one of four buildings that once belonged to the Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, is said to be haunted by an evil spirit. The exterior of the building is made up of red brick and windows and the porch juts out on the side. The inside of the building’s hallways look a little too much like a horror movie for comfort. If you’re still skeptical, the rectory gained the attention of the Travel Channel's Ghost Adventures.
Photo: Erin Gardner
Music Hall
1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine
Music Hall sits on several eerie plots of land and is reported to be one of the most haunted places in America. A portion of the building is situated on an 1800s Potter’s Field, or a cemetery used to unceremoniously bury the poor and unidentified or unclaimed bodies. And then, when a cholera outbreak in 1832 killed hundreds of Cincinnatians, many children became orphans after losing their parents to the horrifying disease. The Cincinnati Orphan Asylum was built next to where Music Hall is today and eventually became a “Pest House” because it entrapped several people with infectious diseases. But it wasn’t until 1876 when excavations began for the construction of Music Hall that workers first came across human bones in and around the foundation. The skeletons found during the excavation were laid to rest in a plot in Spring Grove Cemetery, but more remains were discovered in 1927 when workers were digging a trench. And again in 1988 when, according to the Friends of Music Hall, “workers drilling a new elevator shaft uncovered over two hundred pounds of bones.” And even more recently when Music Hall was revitalized in 2016-17, when workers found human remains under the orchestra pit. Employees ranging from the late former Pops Director Erich Kunzel to the Cincinnati Opera CEO and a night watchman have reported seeing and hearing spirits late at night, including the sound of unearthly music, children in period dress and more. Perhaps some of them are part of the many who died decades prior.
Photo: Emerson Swoger

Music Hall

1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine
Music Hall sits on several eerie plots of land and is reported to be one of the most haunted places in America. A portion of the building is situated on an 1800s Potter’s Field, or a cemetery used to unceremoniously bury the poor and unidentified or unclaimed bodies. And then, when a cholera outbreak in 1832 killed hundreds of Cincinnatians, many children became orphans after losing their parents to the horrifying disease. The Cincinnati Orphan Asylum was built next to where Music Hall is today and eventually became a “Pest House” because it entrapped several people with infectious diseases. But it wasn’t until 1876 when excavations began for the construction of Music Hall that workers first came across human bones in and around the foundation. The skeletons found during the excavation were laid to rest in a plot in Spring Grove Cemetery, but more remains were discovered in 1927 when workers were digging a trench. And again in 1988 when, according to the Friends of Music Hall, “workers drilling a new elevator shaft uncovered over two hundred pounds of bones.” And even more recently when Music Hall was revitalized in 2016-17, when workers found human remains under the orchestra pit. Employees ranging from the late former Pops Director Erich Kunzel to the Cincinnati Opera CEO and a night watchman have reported seeing and hearing spirits late at night, including the sound of unearthly music, children in period dress and more. Perhaps some of them are part of the many who died decades prior.
Photo: Emerson Swoger
Spring House Gazebo
950 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park
Tucked away in the hills Mount Adams sits Eden Park, an urban escape that’s home to the Cincinnati Art Museum, Krohn Conservatory...and the Spring House Gazebo. On Oct. 6, 1927, George “King of the Bootleggers” Remus and his wife, Imogene Remus, were set to meet in court to finalize their divorce. (Imogene was having an affair with a Prohibition agent and the two stole most of George’s money while he did a short stint in jail.) George waited outside of Imogene’s hotel before she left for court and, after she got into a taxi, the two engaged in a heated car chase, ending near the Spring House Gazebo, where George shot Imogene in the stomach as she attempted to flee. Dressed in all black to bemoan her marriage, she died at the hospital from her wound. Those who visit the gazebo today say the have seen a woman wearing all black, presumably Imogene, wandering nearby and felt her presence lurking.
Photo: Wikimedia.com/Greg Hume

Spring House Gazebo

950 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park
Tucked away in the hills Mount Adams sits Eden Park, an urban escape that’s home to the Cincinnati Art Museum, Krohn Conservatory...and the Spring House Gazebo. On Oct. 6, 1927, George “King of the Bootleggers” Remus and his wife, Imogene Remus, were set to meet in court to finalize their divorce. (Imogene was having an affair with a Prohibition agent and the two stole most of George’s money while he did a short stint in jail.) George waited outside of Imogene’s hotel before she left for court and, after she got into a taxi, the two engaged in a heated car chase, ending near the Spring House Gazebo, where George shot Imogene in the stomach as she attempted to flee. Dressed in all black to bemoan her marriage, she died at the hospital from her wound. Those who visit the gazebo today say the have seen a woman wearing all black, presumably Imogene, wandering nearby and felt her presence lurking.
Photo: Wikimedia.com/Greg Hume
Loveland Castle
12025 Shore Drive, Loveland
World War I army medic and Boy Scout troop leader Harry Delos Andrews built the Historic Loveland Castle & Museum, also known as Château Laroche, over the course of 50 years with handmade bricks (formed with quart-sized paper milk cartons) and stones from the nearby Little Miami River. Modeled after European castles, it features towers, a dry moat, hand-tiled ceilings, murder holes and a collection of period weaponry. Andrews lived in the castle until his death in 1981 at the age of 91, when he succumbed to gangrene after sustaining severe leg burns in a trash fire accident on the roof of the castle. After his death, the castle was left to the Knights of the Golden Trail, a local Boy Scout troop. People can visit Loveland Castle today for picnics, tours and more — although Harry is rumored to never have left. Harry’s apparition can be seen wandering around when something is wrong with the castle. According to legend, one day, the Boy Scouts heard doors frantically slamming and they went upstairs to investigate but no one was there. They later found out that the septic tank was damaged and about to cause irreversible damage to the castle. Was this Harry still watching over his life’s work?
Photo: Wikimedia.com/ConlonTT

Loveland Castle

12025 Shore Drive, Loveland
World War I army medic and Boy Scout troop leader Harry Delos Andrews built the Historic Loveland Castle & Museum, also known as Château Laroche, over the course of 50 years with handmade bricks (formed with quart-sized paper milk cartons) and stones from the nearby Little Miami River. Modeled after European castles, it features towers, a dry moat, hand-tiled ceilings, murder holes and a collection of period weaponry. Andrews lived in the castle until his death in 1981 at the age of 91, when he succumbed to gangrene after sustaining severe leg burns in a trash fire accident on the roof of the castle. After his death, the castle was left to the Knights of the Golden Trail, a local Boy Scout troop. People can visit Loveland Castle today for picnics, tours and more — although Harry is rumored to never have left. Harry’s apparition can be seen wandering around when something is wrong with the castle. According to legend, one day, the Boy Scouts heard doors frantically slamming and they went upstairs to investigate but no one was there. They later found out that the septic tank was damaged and about to cause irreversible damage to the castle. Was this Harry still watching over his life’s work?
Photo: Wikimedia.com/ConlonTT
Sedamsville Rectory
639 Steiner Ave., Sedamsville
Get out your EMFs and your holy water. The rectory, which is the one of four buildings that once belonged to the Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, is said to be haunted by an evil spirit. The building historically housed priests, including Father Donald MacLeod, who was hit by a train in the 1800s and whose ghost has been seen wandering near the building. According to the Travel Channel show Ghost Adventures, which went to Sedamsville to perform an exorcism on the property, “This once-holy place of peace and rest, however, has been plagued by a violent, demonic spirit. The current owners of the rectory have experienced ice-cold breezes on boiling-hot days, overwhelming (and spontaneous) feelings of melancholy and have been scratched and shoved by unseen forces.” People have also reported hearing unexplained voices, seeing doors opening and closing on their own, as well as witnessing the spirit of a  child with a noose around its neck.
Photo: Erin Gardner

Sedamsville Rectory

639 Steiner Ave., Sedamsville
Get out your EMFs and your holy water. The rectory, which is the one of four buildings that once belonged to the Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, is said to be haunted by an evil spirit. The building historically housed priests, including Father Donald MacLeod, who was hit by a train in the 1800s and whose ghost has been seen wandering near the building. According to the Travel Channel show Ghost Adventures, which went to Sedamsville to perform an exorcism on the property, “This once-holy place of peace and rest, however, has been plagued by a violent, demonic spirit. The current owners of the rectory have experienced ice-cold breezes on boiling-hot days, overwhelming (and spontaneous) feelings of melancholy and have been scratched and shoved by unseen forces.” People have also reported hearing unexplained voices, seeing doors opening and closing on their own, as well as witnessing the spirit of a child with a noose around its neck.
Photo: Erin Gardner
The Ohio State Reformatory
100 Reformatory Road, Mansfield
Originally a prison, the Ohio State Reformatory opened in 1890. By the 1960s, the prison became overcrowded, brewing nasty diseases and major conflict among prisoners. Some were forced to share calls — even death row inmates. Overpopulation caused a number of inmate deaths. Most died of diseases, some hung themselves and others became severely mentally ill. The prison was forced to close in 1972. The paranormal history of this building is a violent one. Visitors have reported being hit or shoved, hearing cell doors slam and most just feel incredibly uneasy when visiting. Paranormal programs offered by the reformatory rage from public ghost hunts and ghost hunt classes to private investigations.
Photo: Wikimedia.com/AmyTheOvenMitt

The Ohio State Reformatory

100 Reformatory Road, Mansfield
Originally a prison, the Ohio State Reformatory opened in 1890. By the 1960s, the prison became overcrowded, brewing nasty diseases and major conflict among prisoners. Some were forced to share calls — even death row inmates. Overpopulation caused a number of inmate deaths. Most died of diseases, some hung themselves and others became severely mentally ill. The prison was forced to close in 1972. The paranormal history of this building is a violent one. Visitors have reported being hit or shoved, hearing cell doors slam and most just feel incredibly uneasy when visiting. Paranormal programs offered by the reformatory rage from public ghost hunts and ghost hunt classes to private investigations.
Photo: Wikimedia.com/AmyTheOvenMitt
Dent Schoolhouse
5963 Harrison Ave., Dent
Legend says that a group of students mysteriously vanished from the Dent Schoolhouse in 1942, followed by several more disappearances in the years to follow. It wasn’t until 1955 that a foul odor led angry community members to the schools’ janitorial basement, where the students’ bodies were discovered in barrels wedged between the walls. The murders were attributed to the school’s janitor, but the man — Charlie — was never found. That is, until now — Charlie is said to roam the halls of the school today, cleaning alongside the 50 to 65 actors who bring Dent to life every Halloween. In addition to the costumed actors, the actual spirits of his victims are also said to roam the halls and Dent offers ghost tours for those who want to experience the paranormal. Tours (sans actors and manufactured frights) are led by a guide who explains the history of the school and different spectral activities that have occurred in different areas the building. 
Photo: Facebook.com/TheDent Schoolhouse

Dent Schoolhouse

5963 Harrison Ave., Dent
Legend says that a group of students mysteriously vanished from the Dent Schoolhouse in 1942, followed by several more disappearances in the years to follow. It wasn’t until 1955 that a foul odor led angry community members to the schools’ janitorial basement, where the students’ bodies were discovered in barrels wedged between the walls. The murders were attributed to the school’s janitor, but the man — Charlie — was never found. That is, until now — Charlie is said to roam the halls of the school today, cleaning alongside the 50 to 65 actors who bring Dent to life every Halloween. In addition to the costumed actors, the actual spirits of his victims are also said to roam the halls and Dent offers ghost tours for those who want to experience the paranormal. Tours (sans actors and manufactured frights) are led by a guide who explains the history of the school and different spectral activities that have occurred in different areas the building.
Photo: Facebook.com/TheDent Schoolhouse
The Ridges
24 W. State St., Athens
Now called The Ridges, this Ohio University building was originally the Athens Lunatic Asylum and once partially functioned as a tuberculosis ward. For years, it provided care for Civil War veterans, the homeless, the elderly and children where they practiced now questionable treatments like lobotomies and prescribed psychotropic drugs. The causes for many patient’s admission were also questionable —  masturbation, menstrual derangements and even minor alcohol addictions. Patients who died, unclaimed by family, were buried in one of the three cemeteries on the property where headstones were originally labeled by number instead of name. One of the most popular ghost stories involves Margaret Schilling, a patient who went missing for 42 days, and was found dead, naked with her clothes neatly folded next to her, in a locked and abandoned section of the hospital. It is said that her decomposing body left an imprint on the floor which still cannot be removed. Her spirit is said to wander the building along with other disembodied voices, echoing screams and apparitions peering through windows. It is said to be those who were mistreated or died at the hands of the asylum staff.
Photo: Wikimedia.com/Asoep44

The Ridges

24 W. State St., Athens
Now called The Ridges, this Ohio University building was originally the Athens Lunatic Asylum and once partially functioned as a tuberculosis ward. For years, it provided care for Civil War veterans, the homeless, the elderly and children where they practiced now questionable treatments like lobotomies and prescribed psychotropic drugs. The causes for many patient’s admission were also questionable — masturbation, menstrual derangements and even minor alcohol addictions. Patients who died, unclaimed by family, were buried in one of the three cemeteries on the property where headstones were originally labeled by number instead of name. One of the most popular ghost stories involves Margaret Schilling, a patient who went missing for 42 days, and was found dead, naked with her clothes neatly folded next to her, in a locked and abandoned section of the hospital. It is said that her decomposing body left an imprint on the floor which still cannot be removed. Her spirit is said to wander the building along with other disembodied voices, echoing screams and apparitions peering through windows. It is said to be those who were mistreated or died at the hands of the asylum staff.
Photo: Wikimedia.com/Asoep44
Buxton Inn
307 E. Broadway, Granville
Established in 1812, the Buxton Inn is a hotel, tavern and restaurant that takes you back in time. It was incredibly popular in its day, even visited by a few presidents. Today, the ghosts of past owners are said to haunt the building and surrounding land. Major Buxton, one of the owners who the inn was named after, is said to haunt it as well. Guests have reported slamming doors and hearing their names called out. Rooms seven and nine are apparently the most haunted.
Photo: Wikimedia.com/JudMcCranie

Buxton Inn

307 E. Broadway, Granville
Established in 1812, the Buxton Inn is a hotel, tavern and restaurant that takes you back in time. It was incredibly popular in its day, even visited by a few presidents. Today, the ghosts of past owners are said to haunt the building and surrounding land. Major Buxton, one of the owners who the inn was named after, is said to haunt it as well. Guests have reported slamming doors and hearing their names called out. Rooms seven and nine are apparently the most haunted.
Photo: Wikimedia.com/JudMcCranie
The Twin City Opera House
15 W Main St., McConnelsville
This opera house now serves as a theater, houses government offices and a hub for cultural events in the area. It opened to the public in 1892, housed a variety of performances during the Great Depression and has survived the many technological advances of the past decades. According to a story in the Athens The Post, Eric Glosser, a ghost hunter who has worked for the opera house for several years, claims there are 10 to 14 ghosts there. He has had many encounters with Charlie, a supposed demon who lurks in the unused underground tunnels beneath the building. “When he is present, there is a strong electrical charge. You’ll get the hair raised on your arm and you’ll get nauseous,” Glosser tells The Post. Another ghost — Robert, who Glosser claims is friendly — says that Charlie has portals to hell in these tunnels. Out of all the places Glosser has traveled to investigate the paranormal, he claims the Twin Opera House is the most haunted.
Photo: twincityoperahouse.com

The Twin City Opera House

15 W Main St., McConnelsville
This opera house now serves as a theater, houses government offices and a hub for cultural events in the area. It opened to the public in 1892, housed a variety of performances during the Great Depression and has survived the many technological advances of the past decades. According to a story in the Athens The Post, Eric Glosser, a ghost hunter who has worked for the opera house for several years, claims there are 10 to 14 ghosts there. He has had many encounters with Charlie, a supposed demon who lurks in the unused underground tunnels beneath the building. “When he is present, there is a strong electrical charge. You’ll get the hair raised on your arm and you’ll get nauseous,” Glosser tells The Post. Another ghost — Robert, who Glosser claims is friendly — says that Charlie has portals to hell in these tunnels. Out of all the places Glosser has traveled to investigate the paranormal, he claims the Twin Opera House is the most haunted.
Photo: twincityoperahouse.com