The Year in Local Recordings

A look back at some of our favorite 2015 releases by Greater Cincinnati music-makers

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s always, numerous albums, EPs and singles by musical artists from Greater Cincinnati caught our ears in 2015. But know that the list you are about to read is just a snapshot. Perhaps you’ll find something you haven’t heard of before on here, and hopefully you’ll look up artists that sound like they might interest you. But don’t stop there — get out to the clubs or do a little online research and we’re certain you’ll find even more great original works by members of the Cincinnati area’s amazing music scene.

DAN KARLSBERG

THE ’NATI SIX

To record his third album, The ’Nati Six, CCM-grad-turned-teacher Dan Karlsberg enlisted some of the city’s finest veteran Jazz players (dubbing the ensemble The ’Nati Six) and the pianist/composer takes full advantage of the talented musicians’ services. The album features a ton of sublime playing, but it’s also a stellar showcase for Karlsberg’s remarkable writing and arrangement abilities. The creativity and diversity on display have the ability to draw in a new generation of under-exposed Jazz listeners and also earn appreciation from lifelong fans/players, helping to make The ’Nati Six one of the best Jazz albums you’ll hear this year, local or otherwise. (Mike Breen)

SLEEP

THE H.W. BUSH/CLINTON ERA

Sleep’s third full-length release, The H.W. Bush/Clinton Era, is an exhilarating concept album and sonic scrapbook that hearkens back to Hip Hop’s ’90s heyday. There are more than a few moments of hair-raising power on Bush/Clinton, like the gauzily realistic gunfire on “B.Y.O.G.,” the roll call of keep-the-poor-poor realities on “Government Assistance” and the sad litany of local-TV-news shooting reports threaded throughout “Cannibalization,” a candid assessment of the self-destructive elements present in some black neighborhoods that is alternately sympathetic and critical. Like the Straight Outta Compton movie (transferred to the streets of Ohio), it’s an undiluted homage to ’90s Hip Hop that also illuminates the harsh socio-economic circumstances of the era. (Brian Baker)

THE SUNDRESSES

THIS MACHINE KILLS

For longtime fans, This Machine Kills doesn’t mess with The Sundresses’ formula much — it’s just done better. It’s Blues-injected, livewire Rock & Roll, alternately delivered with M-80 explosiveness and a swaggering, slow-burn simmer. The adrenalized rave-ups would be enough to make The Sundresses a must-hear Rock & Roll marvel, but the band has a whole other side to its sound that helps take it miles above its like-minded peers, and makes This Machine Kills a dynamic, start-to-finish masterwork. The band is capable of nimbly dialing back the tempestuous energy and crawl into a creeping, slower-paced mode that is as impactful and potent as the barnburners. (MB)

HONEY & HOUSTON

BARCELONA

The debut album from Country/Americana/Folk group Honey & Houston is one of the best debut albums to emanate from the Greater Cincinnati music scene in recent memory. There’s not a down moment on the enchanting Barcelona — from the rollicking, spine-tingling opener “Rosie” and the quartet’s buoyant, soulful take on the traditional Gospel tune “In My Time of Dying” to the Folk-rockin’ “Dreamer” and the strutting and soaring title track. If this is just the beginning, watch out — these musicians have a masterpiece in them and have shown (with Barcelona and live shows) they have what it takes to take their music to the masses and enrapture them. (MB)

ANDY GABBARD

FLUFF

Last year, fans of Cincinnati rockers Buffalo Killers were treated to two superb new releases. In 2015, the solo debut album by the band’s singer/guitarist Andy Gabbard also turned heads. Fluff is a magnificent Rock & Roll album overflowing with so many stellar, brain-burrowing melodies, it’s more than fair to call it a Power Pop record (emphasis on both the “power” and the “Pop,” equally). (MB)

DAAP GIRLS

LOOK INSIDE YOUR LOVE

DAAP Girls’ s in-concert energy is wholly captured on its second album, Look Inside Your Love. The band’s sonic charisma is inherent and it shines in the context of the album’s warm, vintage feel. Still, the album does allow for a closer look at the group’s musical craftiness, which can sometimes be missed in the frantic blur of its live show. DAAP Girls’ music engagingly balances intense fervency with a supple, sensuous swing, and that multifaceted nature makes for a stimulating listening experience with broad appeal. With Look Inside Your Love, DAAP Girls find the sweet spot between the sweaty grit of a Rock & Roll show and the sweaty grind of an all-night dance party. (MB)

LEMON SKY

DOS

Lemons Sky’s 2011 self-titled debut was full-bore Rock with a modern Pop heart, like Jellyfish steered by Led Zeppelin and Queen rather than The Beatles. That same framework exists on Lemon Sky’s sophomore album, Dos, but the band’s shifting lineup and natural creative evolution over the past four years have resulted in expansive and kaleidoscopic growth. Building on the band’s existing foundation of thunderous Rock with a sweet/sour minor-key Pop melodicism, Dos is alternately reminiscent of Wish You Were Here-era Pink Floyd, a mash-up of Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath, a tribute to avowed influence Captain Beyond and a nod to The Beatles in the Abbey Road crosswalk. (BB)

TO NO END

REMORA

With Remora, To No End blends the Kenny Wayne Shepherd-meets-Warren Haynes Blues direction of the band’s debut with a blistering ’70s Hard Rock energy. Split into a pair of stylistically-distinct sides, the album showcases the group’s deft modern Blues/Hard Rock translation, a riff-laden celebration of the forms painted with a new brush, as well as its gentler elements. On the second half of the release, To No End dials down the volume but not the songwriting intensity. Rather than interspersing Remora’s more sedate songs with amped-up fist-pumping anthems, To No End shows two different sides of themselves to suit your listening moods — further proof of its thoughtful creativity and amazing talent. (BB)

AARON COLLINS AND THE BLIND CONDUCTORS

AARON COLLINS AND THE BLIND CONDUCTORS EP

Aaron Collins and The Blind Conductors’ debut EP feels like a logical progression from Collins’ stunning solo debut, Godlessly Oscillating , albeit with a more extroverted sonic personality. But the music still has that same dreamlike spirit that made Oscillating so magical — it’s haunting, uniquely textural, unpredictable, enigmatically atmospheric and thoroughly entrancing. The band does add an extra vigor to the proceedings — standout track “Scar” pulsates on funky Post Punk groove, while “Seasick” is a dynamic aural journey that builds into a full-on guitar-flailing eruption. (MB)

BRAD MYERS

– PRIME NUMBERS

Multi-faceted and experienced guitarist Brad Myers’ solo debut, Prime Numbers, has scored glowing reviews from respected national Jazz outlets. On the album, Myers and his group truly shine on originals like the delicately powerful “Bentley’s Blues” and the tropical, swaying “There is Space for Us.” Prime Numbers’ highlight is the boldly nuanced “Rule of Threes,” a nearly 12-minute noir-ish Jazz jam that bisects the album’s overall arc, a cinematic side journey that is foreshadowed by the first half of the album and naturally leads to the concluding second half. (BB)

MOONBOW

– VOLTO DEL DEMONE

After showcasing a heavy, Sabbath-indebted sound on its 2013 debut, Moonbow decided to throw a curveball in the form of an acoustic-based album. The resulting Volto del Demone isn’t your typical “unplugged” Rock record — the musicians adapt incredibly well to the acoustic setting and aren’t simply playing scorching rockers without electric guitars. Yet the group also doesn’t sound like a completely different band, making like a Rock & Roll chameleon by showing an intensity and creativity regardless of the instrumentation. (MB)

US, TODAY

– TENENEMIES

Post Rock provocateurs Us, Today flipped the script on its improv structure for the composed and concussive latest album, Tenenemies, which vibrates with sonic tension and visceral intent. After five years of exploring minimalist Post Rock’s frontiers, Tenenemies possesses the rhythmic flow of a story told and a physical journey completed. (BB)

ROYAL HOLLAND

– VOLUME 2 - FLAMINGO EP

While Folk is a part of Royal Holland’s sound, on Flamingo, singer/songwriter Matt Mooney toys with the boundaries of that genre tag with a sound that incorporates heavy doses of Rock and Indie Pop (the light Electronic dashes from the first EP are largely gone). Whatever you want to call it, Flamingo once again shows Mooney’s fantastic (and evolving) abilities as a songwriter. As stellar as Flamingo is, it still feels like it’s only scratching the surface of what Royal Holland is capable of. (MB)

HARBOUR

– WITH LOVE EP

Cincinnati Indie Pop/Rock foursome Harbour has developed a large and loyal fan base locally, and recent industry attention could mean that more love could be coming Harbour’s way on a much wider level. If the band’s new EP, With Love — with its abundance of instantly catchy hooks and buoyant, radiant Pop/Rock vibe — is any indication, grabbing the national spotlight is much more than just a pipe dream. (MB)

DANIEL WAYNE AND THE SILVER LINES

– DANIEL WAYNE AND THE SILVER LINES

After living in New York for several years, Daniel Wayne returned to Cincinnati and formed the all-star Silver Lines to record a self-titled atmospheric and rootsy Country/Folk/Rock debut album (he has a slightly different local all-star crew for live shows). Both entities are stacked decks of local talent, lending more than a little credibility to Wayne’s material, which bristles with contemporary verve and classic timelessness, giving the album a My Morning Jacket/Avett Brothers/Wilco vibe. (BB)

COCONUT MILK

– WE’RE SORRY EP

Local Indie Pop/Rock quintet Coconut Milk describes its sound as “Beach Rock,” which is one of the more precise self-descriptions by a band you’ll ever see. Like the best oceanfront-linked music (going back to The Beach Boys, but think more “Warmth of the Sun” than “Surfin’ USA”), there is a compelling blend of airy contentment and wistful melancholy to Coconut Milk’s sound. If Belle and Sebastian and Nada Surf went on a writing retreat to some small beach town on the West Coast, they’d probably come up with something similar to what Coconut Milk lays down on We’re Sorry . (MB)

LIVID

– AS IT HAPPENS

As It Happens shows LiViD, which has been active for the past 15 years, in top form. The album is crisply produced and impressive from start to finish, showcasing the band’s broad-view approach to Hard Rock, which combines air-tight rhythms and riffs and more brutal, in-your-face elements with soaring, arena-ready hooks and dynamic song arrangements, sounding a little like a pristine blend of Fall Out Boy, Korn and Deftones. Finding the intersection of grinding, grunting heaviness and accessibility makes them perfectly suited for commercial Rock radio stations. (MB)

JANE DECKER

– STONEWALLIN’ EP

Jane Decker’s most recent work is a directional shift from the arty Indie Pop of her fairly successful previous band, Belle Histoire. Moving to a purer mainstream brand of catchy, straightforward Pop, the Stonewallin’ EP came out in April, two weeks before Decker’s 21st birthday, and rightfully garnered her some national attention. (BB)

CASINO WARRIOR

– CENTAUR

Newcomers Casino Warriors’ riff-laden, five-track release, Centaur, follows in the same vein as other Rock/Metal hybrids that are currently dominating many a longhairs’ playlist. If the likes of Red Fang, Black Tusk, Orange Goblin or old The Sword cause your skull and brain to repeatedly high five, then Centaur is right up your alley. If you’re a Cincinnati Rock and/or Metal fan, do yourself a favor and jump on the Casino Warrior bandwagon now — it’s about to get much more crowded. (Nick Grever)

WILDER

– WILDER EP

Americana/Country group Wilder was formed by singer/songwriters Kelly Thomas and Randy Steffen after their previous projects had come to an end. Wilder’s self-titled EP is fleshed out by the impressive guitar work of Zach Rowe, impeccable drumming from two of the city’s best, Kevin Hogle and Christopher Alley, and some brilliant harmonies. But what makes Wilder such a compelling introduction is the fantastic songwriting; the band’s bio says the group was started around the basic idea of “(writing) songs that stand on their own.” Mission accomplished. The band’s sound shows elements of classic Country and its modern cousin, AltCountry, but Steffen and Thomas’ writing is timeless. (MB)

BOB CUSHING

– TROUBADOUR SONGS EP

Bob Cushing’s sound is a mix of Heartland Rock and earthy Country (the true-blue stuff, not the modern Pop version)… or as he calls it on the opening title track, “Redneck Hippie Rock and Soul.” Cushing’s lyrics are consistently engaging, full of honesty and passion, with dashes of his trademark humor poking through.  With a soundtrack that resembles a roadhouse Bruce Springsteen/Hank Williams, Jr. jam session, Cushing turns Troubadour Songs into a snapshot of his current feelings about the life he’s lived and the life that’s still ahead of him. His no-nonsense approach is remarkably refreshing. (MB)

THE PART-TIME GENTLEMEN

– WHISKEY ON MY BREATH

The Part-Time Gentlemen’s 10-track debut is a mix of traditional songs and originals. It’s a testament to the group’s writing abilities and understanding of the source material that the handful of original tracks aren’t all that discernible from the tunes plucked from American Roots music’s traditional songbook. Greater Cincinnati’s rich Roots music scene is overflowing with incredible talent right now and Whiskey on My Breath, as well as the band’s adrenalized live performances, prove that The Part-Time Gentlemen is among the best the area has to offer. (MB)

NEW SINCERITY WORKS

– NOWADAYS

Earning comparisons to Big Star, Paul Westerberg and Guided By Voices for his debut New Sincerity Works, singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Mike Tittel carved an impressive notch. With a penchant for clever wordplay, ringing guitar anthemics and Beatlesque melodies, with this year’s Nowadays, Tittel hits near the bullseye that local Pop Rock notables like The Raisins (and their subsequent solo/group projects), Roger Klug and Brian Lovely and the Secret have all hit over the years with supernatural precision and power. (BB)

OLD CITY

– THE SUN IS MY LIGHT EP

Cincinnati Indie Rock trio Old City went old school with its 2015 EP/maxi-single release, putting the four-song The Sun is My Light out on “cassingle” (that’s a single on a cassette for those under 35). The release is a great sampler of powerful Indie Rock that puts a fresh spin on the best of the genre’s pre- and post-breakthrough years in the ’90s. (MB)

THE GOODLE BOYS

– LONG WAY HOME

On Long Way Home, The Goodle Boys showcase their deft blend of Folk, Bluegrass and Blues across 10 original tracks that masterfully capture the spirit of the originators that influenced the band (and generations of other musicians). Along with the skilled musicianship (delivered on banjo, guitar, standup bass, harmonica and mandolin) and rock-solid arrangements, Long Way Home stands out due to the compelling lyrics, which have a timeless storyteller quality that fits perfectly into the Folk tradition. (MB)

COMMON CENTER

– GYPSY RIVER

After nearly a year in the studio and a successful crowd-funding campaign, unique Northern Kentucky-based seven-piece band Common Center released its debut full-length, Gypsy River. The band’s sound is hard to categorize, a progressive fusion of endless influences played with instrumentation that includes prominent strings and saxophone. Common Center’s Facebook page tags its genre as “Psychedelic Gypsy Rock (Soul-clad) Boogie Funk,” which comes fairly close to describing the quirky vibe conjured on the album. (MB)

DAVE MCDONNELL

– THE TIME INSIDE A YEAR

After establishing himself in his native Chicago’s rich Jazz scene, Dave McDonnell relocated to teach music, but he’s also continued his acclaimed recording/performing career. McDonnell and his Group (a version of which features Cincinnati players for area live shows) returned to record-store shelves in 2015 with the time inside a year, his debut for esteemed Chicago Jazz label Delmark. While McDonnell adheres to his winning compositional-vs.-improvisational strategy on the time inside a year, he also adds a new wrinkle with a slightly older piece from his canon, namely his three-movement suite “AEpse,” which grew out of his doctorate studies and which he debuted in Chicago two years ago. (BB)

POMEGRANATES

– HEALING POWER

A couple of years after retiring as band, Indie Pop faves Pomegranates returned briefly in 2015 to play a pair of sold-out shows and release its shelved fifth full-length, Healing Power.  The sprawling album has several propulsive moments, including the staggering, stuttering majesty of the seven-minute “Hand of Death” and the tribal electric blast of “House of My Mortal Father.” There is also a fairly diverse dynamic across Healing Power’s 13 cuts, which careen from those spurts of high energy to atmospheric and moody Pop confections, like the gentle and aptly titled “Taking It Easy” and the melancholic reverie of “Morning Light,” with the strolling bounce of the title track finding the middle ground between those stylistic ends of the spectrum. (BB)

JIM PELZ

– LOSER ANGELS

Jim Pelz, singer/guitarist for the great local Americana/Bluegrass crew Hickory Robot, released his first solo album in 2015, the 13-track gem Loser Angels. The album is a great exhibition of Pelz’s ace songwriting talents and timeless sound, effortlessly moving from smoking Country Rock to sublime Roots/Americana balladry and beyond. (MB)

NEW MOONS

– GLASS PLANET

Splintered off of previous band Big Rock Club, New Moons concoct a sound that is reminiscent of ’90s AltRock’s heyday, but doesn’t put off too much of a retro vibe. It’s simply a strong Rock & Roll record, highlighted by cuts like “Dream Street,” with its gliding guitar riffs, the memorable “You Don’t Need to Know Me” and closer “Morning Light,” a woozy, swaying track with some stinging guitar leads piercing the haze. With good chops and promising songwriting, Glass Planet shows New Moons is a band to keep an eye on. (MB)

RUSTY BURGE AND STEVE ALLEE

– FARAWAY

Vibraphonist and Cincinnati Jazz staple Rusty Burge’s 2015 duo album with pianist Steve Allee, the blissful and understated Faraway, lives up to the title. Quietly evocative yet passionately intense, the seven originals (three from Burge, four from Allee) and two covers (Duke Ellington’s “Isfahan” and Charlie Mingus’ “Goodbye Pork Pie Hat”) exude a laidback vibe while showcasing the glorious virtuosity of both players as their talents meld into an effortlessly complementary pas de deux. (BB)

HOWARD BROTHERS BAND

– GO A LI’L FASTER

Driven by the powerhouse riffs, stirring leads and hearty vocals and anchored by chunky but finessed rhythms, Go a Li’L Faster (the Howard Brothers Band’s first release in seven years) is bursting with thick, heavy grooves and a distinct swagger, with guitar work that recalls ex-Guns N’ Roses axman Slash in peak form. It’s an enjoyable Rock album that would fit nicely in a record collection heavy on artists like Aerosmith, Ted Nugent, Mountain, Bad Company and another sibling-driven group, The Allman Brothers Band. (MB)

BEN KNIGHT & THE WELLDIGGERS

– AMERICAN HIGHWAYS

Recorded largely live in a single room with minimal overdubs in studios in Nashville, Tenn., and Cincinnati, American Highways has an earthy, intimate and timeless feel that matches the soulful songs. Ben Knight and the band combine various Americana forms (from Country and Folk to vintage Rock & Roll and more contemporary Heartland Rock) and give them a hearty pulse and Rock-edged veneer. But American Highways isn’t a touristy exploration of genres — the band has its own distinct identity, building its sound around Knight’s remarkably engaging songwriting. (MB)

DEAD MAN STRING BAND

– I

Dead Man String Band is the impressive one-man Rock & Roll show masterminded by guitarist/singer Rob McAllister, who’s been impressing local audiences with his high-octane live act since beginning the project last year. A fingerpicking guitar specialist, McAllister creates a full-band sound in concert with the help of a kick-drum set up, great vocals and some solid, Roots- and Blues-inflected songwriting, which sound just as great on the Dead Man String Band’s debut album, I. (MB)

GO GO BUFFALO

– IT AIN’T WORTH IT EP

Go Go Buffalo’s five-track It Ain’t Worth It kicks off with “Ironclad Lad,” which is loaded with winding riffage, heavy, shape-shifting rhythms and Diamond Jim’s gruff, eye-bulging vocals. Elsewhere, “Worth It” shows the psychedelic side of the band a bit more; it still retains that Hard Rock fire, but the arrangement takes so many twists and turns in just over four minutes, you may want to pop a Dramamine before listening (and if you’re flashback prone, perhaps strap yourself to a chair, because those evil laughs will have you flinching uncontrollably). (MB)

WONKY TONK

– STUFF WE LEAVE BEHIND

Greater Cincinnati’s Jasmine Poole has been tearing up stages as Wonky Tonk in and out of town for years, but in 2015 she released her first album, the stellar Stuff We Leave Behind. With six years and four engineers behind the project, perhaps the most amazing aspect of Stuff We Leave Behind is its cohesion. The album hangs together as a tight collection of disparate songs — either Country-tinged Indie Rock or Indie Rock-tinted Country — but nothing seems out of place or forced. (BB)

THE HAPPY MALADIES – THE HAPPY MALADIES

Even a cursory listen to The Happy Maladies’ slim but impressive Chamber-Folk-meets-Indie-in-Jazztown catalog reveals a certain thoughtful deliberation, but the band members say they didn’t recognize they were even making “an album” until their phenomenal 2015 self-titled full-length was finished. In the six years since Sun Shines the Little Children, The Happy Maladies’ full-length debut, they’ve been anything but idle. They released the new again EP in 2012 and they’ve remained a regularly active live presence (as a band and individually) around and beyond the area. This year also saw the release of the collaborative Must Love Cats, a recording featuring original works by a broad spectrum of musical composers who responded to the band’s call for compositions. (BB)

MAURICE MATTEI

– GIRL JUNGLE

Like the bulk of Maurice Mattei’s wonderfully tremulous catalog, Girl Jungle finds the adept songwriter shining his lovelight through the kaleidoscope of his musical influences, resulting in unique but colorfully familiar reflections and dancing patterns. Like picking flecks of individual colors out of a mosaic, it’s not difficult to identify fleeting touches of Bob Dylan, Randy Newman, Steve Forbert, Bruce Springsteen, maybe even Iggy Pop and Jimmy Buffett, but the larger sonic picture that Maurice Mattei creates is always a fascinating and personal self-portrait. (BB)

UMIN

– LINE

Line continues umin’s all-instrumental collaging of baritone ukulele riffs and rhythms, which are often chopped, looped and otherwise manipulated and blended with electronic additives. The 13-track album is an incredibly fluid listen, but the fluttering atmospherics shape-shift throughout. Sometimes the music is hypnotic or meditative, while other times it’s utterly disorienting, though it’s almost as if the listener’s state of mind going in determines the effect, with umin’s soundscapes merely molding to that mood. (MB)

BOYMEETSWORLD

– BECOME SOMEONE

Bristling with youthful energy while displaying the thoughtful deliberation of an older band, Become Someone, Pop Rock band BoyMeetsWorld’s self-released debut full-length, was released ahead of the group’s appearance on the entire summertime Warped Tour in 2015. BoyMeetsWorld’s buoyant melodies and frenetic presentation help its music transcend the work of many of its peers. (BB)

CHAKRAS

– BLACK SUNRISE: THE OJAI SESSIONS EP

After raising funds through a Kickstarter campaign, Cincinnati rockers Chakras headed to California to record with one of the Rock world’s top producers, Joe Chiccarelli. The band worked on six songs during the 14-day sessions, and Chakras released three of them (“Swagger,” “Cherish to Perish” and “Earthquakes Everywhere”) as the fantastic-sounding EP, Black Sunrise: The Ojai Sessions. (MB)

DALLAS MOORE

– DARK HORSE RIDER

On his latest and perhaps best album of powerful originals, Dark Horse Rider, successful singer/songwriter Dallas Moore displays his typical pastiche of various influences — Country both traditional and Outlaw, Folk, Southern Rock, Bluegrass, Blues — unified by his passionate presentation. The album is a perfect storm of Moore’s unique storytelling abilities and incendiary performances. After 20-plus years, Moore and his band have crafted the release that should help them get to the next level. (MB)

MARK BECKNELL

– LIKE THE VINE

Local musician Mark Becknell has been primarily known as a drummer/percussionist and has worked with a wide range of local acts. But Becknell is also an excellent singer/songwriter, as evidenced on his debut full-length solo album, Like the Vine. The recording highlights Becknell’s impressive Folk/Americana songwriting, which is given a uniquely ethereal vibe on the album that suggests a collaboration with super-producer Daniel Lanois would be a perfect fit. (MB)

THE Z.G.S

– THE Z.G.S

The Z.G.s’ self-titled album is impressive in its ability to straddle several generations of Punk Rock — you can hear elements of some of today’s more powerful and melodic bands, but there are also traces of pioneers like The Clash evident in the Cincy group’s throbbing, buzzing bluster. The band sets itself apart with strong songwriting and guitar work, a powerful rhythmic throttle and lyrics that also seem to encapsulate many of Punk’s main themes since its inception. The band touches on political and social issues and offers working-class observations, but the songs also get more personal and internal at times, like on the pining “Used to Be.” (MB)

THE MOXIE BAND

– EMINENT DOMAIN

The Moxie Band estimates that between its five members it has about 200 years of experience performing music. The band’s experience can be heard in the expert chops evident on Eminent Domain, which includes The Moxie Band’s smooth, groove-based arrangements of material by the likes of Duke Robillard, Michelle Shocked and others. The album also features three songs written by Ed Cunningham of Cincinnati’s Comet Bluegrass All-Stars, including the swingin’ “Money,” which was co-written with fellow Bluegrass legend Katie Laur. (MB)

Even More Great 2015 Releases

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40LBS OF LYETHE HILLBILLY DEATHTRAP DEMOS EP

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TECHNICOLOR MONSTER FOREWORD EP

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VARQUIS ESSENCE OF A KING

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JACK BURTON OVERDRIVETARBELL STREET

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