476 Dayton St.

Address: 476 Dayton St., West EndOwner: Priscilla White and othersCurrent Property Value: $6,500 in 2001Year Built: 1881Comments: According to the Cincinnati Buildings and Inspections Depa

 
476 Dayton St



Address: 476 Dayton St., West End

Owner: Priscilla White and others

Current Property Value: $6,500 in 2001

Year Built: 1881

Comments: According to the Cincinnati Buildings and Inspections Department, the building at 476 Dayton St. has been placed on the Dead Buildings List, a list of condemned buildings the city is trying to tear down.

"It's been condemned and it's considered a hazard," says Mike Perkins, an inspector in the department.

He says the next step in the process is for the issue to go before the Board of Building Appeals, where the building could be declared a public nuisance. After such a declaration, if nothing is done to correct the problems, the building could be torn down.

According to Perkins, the owner can present her case to the board. She can also post a bond to cover the cost of building demolition and then be given the opportunity to arrange a stay to bring the building into compliance with the Cincinnati Building Code.

On Dec. 28, 2001, the owner was ordered to take down or remove the building or cause the unsafe condition to be remedied within 30 days. According to Perkins, a final notice was issued Jan. 22, 2002, giving the owner an additional 30 days to take care of the situation.

Priscilla White, one of the building's owners, says the building has been in her family since the 1940s. She says she'd like to rehab the buildings she owns at 476 and 478 Dayton St. and is seeking funding to do so.

"I would like to live in them," she says.

White says that when she was younger she did live in the house at 476 Dayton, and the buildings have sentimental value to her. She knows the renovation process will be costly and says it would be difficult to rehabilitate the two buildings independently of each other because they share an interior wall.



Blight of the Week is an effort to highlight the problem of abandoned bulidings —and who's responsible for them.

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