Art: Rendered Obsolete at Aisle Gallery

The current exhibition at Aisle Gallery focuses on a centuries-old practice: printmaking. Rachel Heberling and Katherine Rogers seem to have found their niche in concentrating on straightforward lithography and etching, and the beauty that can be found t

The current exhibition at Aisle Gallery, Rendered Obsolete: Printmaking by Rachel E. Heberling and Katherine Rogers, focuses on a centuries-old practice — printmaking. Of course, the practice has changed and expanded since its inception, but Heberling and Rogers seem to have found their niche in concentrating on straightforward lithography and etching, and the beauty that can be found there.

Likewise, both artists draw on aged and abandoned subject matter for their prints, often revealing a sad splendor in the relics of a past era. Heberling, an MFA candidate at Ohio State University, has a clear focus to her work. She concentrates on her natural surroundings. Natural, in this sense, having nothing to do with nature, but with the immediate surroundings of her home. Rogers, a printmaker based in Mertztown, Penn., also casts her eye to abandonment.

This time-consuming, delicate and intricate practice has morphed into the often-outrageous, stacked-upon, punched-out, layered, cut and twisted forms we see in a lot of contemporary galleries. But there is something to be said about Heberling and Rogers finding their way back through time, into the era when printmaking was just that — delicate, fastidious, detailed and beautiful.

1-4 p.m. Monday-Friday through July 31. Get venue details and read Laura Leffler's full review here.

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