Cincinnati Organization Combating Hate Crimes Expands

“We are honored to take a lead in the work of the coalition, which aligns with our work of inspiring action today. Fighting racism, antisemitism, injustice and hatred has never been as important as it is right now.”

The Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center - Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
The Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center

The Cincinnati Regional Coalition Against Hate (CRCAH) says there has been a rise in hate crimes around the city; to combat this, they are expanding their services and offerings. 

The coalition said in a release that they are poised to expand within the year broadly. Part of that expansion is that the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center will now serve as the convener of the CRCAH.

They say CRCAH officially launched in 2018 as a nonpartisan alliance of organizations committed to being vigilant against hate activity by supporting impacted communities and fostering acceptance, compassion and justice for all in the Cincinnati region.

Organizers say the expansion will get a jumpstart by hiring their first-ever program manager, Julie Sunderland. She will lead the coalition's direct victim and incident support services as well as fundraising efforts. The role includes tracking hate crimes locally and developing programs to engage the community. 

“We are honored to take a lead in the work of the coalition, which aligns with our work of inspiring action today,” said CEO of the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center Sarah L. Weiss. “Fighting racism, antisemitism, injustice and hatred has never been as important as it is right now.”

Weiss says the coalition will work to track local data on hate crimes, an important metric with limited data. 

According to the Anti-Defamation League, the FBI reported 7,314 hate crimes in the United States in 2019, an 18% increase since 2011. 

“Minority communities are experiencing a dramatic rise in hatred right now. One day, it is the Asian or Hispanic community,” said Jaipal Singh, an active member of the Sikh community and the CRCAH. “The next, it is the Black community or the Muslim community. Whether it is through hurtful hate speech or violent hate crime, we know everyday Cincinnatians who are being targeted because of their identity.

"My own community is getting attacked every day. Across the nation, innocent people have lost their lives. But as a Sikh, I stand up against hate by living the symbolism of my turban: a beacon of hope, a sign of love, and a commitment to recognize the human race as One. We must embrace these values to unite against hate. We must all stand up in solidarity to ensure that hate has no place here in our town.” 

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