Fall Arts Calendar

Check out the visual arts, dance, film, classical music and theater Cincinnati has to offer this upcoming season.

Visit our Fall Arts Preview page for stories about area artists and their crafts.
 

AUGUST

VISUAL ARTS: THE GOODWILL BIENNIAL


Keith Banner and Bill Ross, the imaginative operators of Thunder-Sky, Inc., have come up with another clever idea, asking Ohio Valley Goodwill Industries to set aside a year’s worth of donated handmade art. Along with Matt Distel of the Carnegie and Melanie Derrick of 1305 Gallery, they will jury an exhibit of these paintings and other objects, looking for outstanding examples of folk and outsider art. Opening Reception: 6-10 p.m. Aug. 28. Through Oct. 15. Free. Thunder-Sky, Inc., 4573 Hamilton Ave., Northside, raymondthundersky.org. (Steven Rosen)

VISUAL ARTS: CINCINNATI ARTIST SURVIVAL


For this juried exhibition, Cincinnati artists will explore the real and fictional ways they survive (and hopefully thrive) here. There will be work and performances by CS13, Marc Governanti, Suzy Irwin, Steve Kemple, Chase Melendez, Reid Radcliffe, Christian Schmit, Forest Thomer, Aaron Walker, Loraine Wible and Matt Wiseman. Aug. 29-Oct. 10. Free. Wave Pool, 2940 Colerain Ave., Camp Washington, wavepoolgallery.org. (SR)

VISUAL ARTS: LIGHT STRIKES


To celebrate the opening of its 10,500-square-foot Lindner Annex — in what once had been a grocery store — the Kennedy Heights Art Center is presenting this exhibit by PAR-Projects, the innovative Northside-based arts group. It will be in a large, intentionally dimly lit space that encourages viewers to interact with large-scale work by Intermedio, Team B, Sean Mullaney, Karen Saunders and Rob Wolpert. There will also be a parade to mark the campus’ opening at 11 a.m. on Aug. 29, followed by a festival. Aug. 29-Sept. 30. Free. Lindner Annex, Kennedy Heights Cultural Campus, 6620 Montgomery Road, Kennedy Heights, kennedyarts.org. (SR)

SEPTEMBER


VISUAL ARTS: SEEING CALVINO: INVISIBLE CITIES


Ohio artists Leighton Connor, Matt Kish and Joe Kuth create illustrations responding to ideas raised by Italian writer Italo Calvino (1923-1985), whose most famous work — Invisible Cities — imagines how cities looked through the eyes of Marco Polo. The 55 featured illustrations were recently projected on screens during a festival in Rome. The show will be in the Popular Library department of the main branch of the Cincinnati Public Library. Sept. 1-Nov. 15. Free. Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Main Branch, 800 Vine St., Downtown, cincinnatilibrary.org. (SR)

ONSTAGE: A CHORUS LINE


Just because Cincinnati Landmark Productions opened the Incline Theater, don’t think that nothing’s happening at the Covedale Center. The 2015-2016 season opens with one of the all-time great musicals, a stunning show about a chorus audition for a Broadway musical. Great songs by Marvin Hamlisch are part of the appeal — “What I Did for Love” and “One (Singular Sensation)” — but ultimately A Chorus Line is about ambitions and personal histories, tales that appeal to everyone who’s aspired to be more. Sept. 3-27. $21-$24. Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glendale Ave., Covedale, cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. (Rick Pender)

ONSTAGE: LUNA GALE


Rebecca Gilman’s powerful 2014 play kicks off the 30th season at Ensemble Theatre, Cincinnati’s go-to venue for local premieres of great shows from Broadway, off-Broadway and beyond. This one is about a veteran social worker handling what appears to be a typical case of teenage drug addicts accused of neglecting their baby. She places their daughter in the care of her grandmother and family conflict erupts, forcing the social worker into a heartbreaking moral dilemma. Sept. 8-27. $28-$44. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, 1127 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, ensemblecincinnati.org. (RP)

DANCE: CINCINNATI BALLET’S KAPLAN NEW WORKS


This regular season-opener is famous for letting audiences see dancers up close in a small venue (this year at the Aronoff’s 350-seat Jarson-Kaplan Theater) and featuring lots of shows. Three world premieres are on the bill this year: Adam Hougland’s solo for Patric Palkens, who’s now a principal dancer; Viktor Plotnikov’s mix of video and dance; and Tulsa Ballet resident choreographer Ma Cong’s work. BalletMet Columbus dancer Gabriel Gaffney Smith brings work set to his own original composition. Sept. 11-19. Tickets start at $55. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cballet.org. (Kathy Valin)

ONSTAGE: THE SECRET GARDEN


Frances Hodgson Burnett’s novel The Secret Garden has been the favorite of young readers for more than a century. The story became an award-winning musical in 1991, and it’s just the kind of family-friendly show that Playhouse Artistic Director Blake Robison has been bringing to the Eden Park theater for three seasons. It’s the story of Mary Lennox, age 10, who loses her parents to cholera in India and is sent to live with her inattentive uncle in his foreboding English manor. But it’s also the site of an abandoned garden, and that changes everything. Sept. 10-Oct. 3. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, cincyplay.com. (RP)

DANCE: POV


POV — presented by Pones, Inc., in collaboration with Queen City Flash and others — takes a unique look at poverty, homelessness and the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood this September. Wear comfortable shoes as you walk from place to place, beginning in Washington Park, to view dance by this small modern company known for its keen use of pedestrian movement style. Watch documentary video along the way. POV, refurbished from work seen previously here and in Italy, has been called “powerful, meaningful, sensual and poetic.” Sept. 11-13. $15. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, ponesinc.wordpress.com. (KV)

ONSTAGE: CYRANO DE BERGERAC


Edmond Rostand’s romantic drama from 1897 about the swashbuckling soldier and brilliant poet is the kind of non-Shakespearean classic that Cincinnati Shakespeare excels at producing. Although he loves the beautiful Roxane, he thinks his appearance — an oversized nose —means he doesn’t have a chance with her. So he helps a handsome but empty-headed cadet woo her with dazzling, passionate letters and poems. He pours out his own heart — but she understands too late his real feelings. There’s a lot of swagger, but even more heartfelt emotion in this show. Sept. 11- Oct. 3. $14-$36. Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, 719 Race St., Downtown, cincyshakes.com. (RP)

DANCE: DANCEFIX AT SECOND SUNDAY


Second Sunday on Main dances its way into September, when the 10-year-old eclectic monthly neighborhood festival presented by Main Street OTR and the Over-the-Rhine Chamber of Commerce features Heather Britt’s DanceFix leading a festive conga line. Enjoy two stages, music, food trucks, dozens of vendors and an outdoor beer garden. Pop-up dance events and a late afternoon dance party complete the lineup. Noon-5 p.m. Sept. 13. Free. Main Street between 12th and Liberty, Over-the-Rhine, secondsundayonmain.org. (KV)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: CONCERT:NOVA AND THE MITCHELLS


Leave it to concert:nova to mash up with The Mitchells, stars in the area Indie Pop scene, for intriguing music collaborations. The starting points are two of Franz Schubert’s most famous song cycles dealing with love and loss, “Winterreise (Winter Journey)” and “Die Schöne Müllerin (The Lovely Miller Maid).” Concert:nova’s cellist Ted Nelson and incomparable pianist Julie Spangler combine their songwriting talents with The Mitchells’ Classically tinged approach. 8 p.m. Sept. 15. $12-$30. Woodward Theater, 1404 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, concertnova.com. (Anne Arenstein)


ONSTAGE: FRANKIE AND JOHNNY IN THE CLAIR DE LUNE


New Edgecliff has been drifting from venue to venue for several seasons, but now it’s ready to call Urban Artifact brewery (the former St. Patrick Church in Northside) home. Its first production in the former church sanctuary is a play about an unlikely love affair between two middle-aged losers — a motor-mouthed, romantic dishwasher and a reclusive waitress. We meet them just after a one-night stand, but they don’t seem like candidates for happiness. Nevertheless, Terrence McNally’s play — sometimes touching and sometimes hilarious — ultimately offers some promise of better things to come. Sept. 17-Oct. 3. $20-$27. New Edgecliff Theatre at Urban Artifact, 1622 Blue Rock St., Northside, newedgecliff.com. (RP)

FILM: BLACK MASS


Johnny Depp seeks to atone for the sins of his most recent lackluster projects — including Mortdecai, Into the Woods and Transcendence — by teaming up with Scott Cooper (Crazy Heart and Out of the Furnace) for a depraved and disturbing look at the life and times of Whitey Bulger. The infamous South Boston criminal became an FBI informant in an investigation into a mafia family horning in on his territory. With Benedict Cumberbatch, Joel Edgerton, Kevin Bacon and Peter Sarsgaard rounding out the cast, expect a pitch-black descent into a hellish underworld. In theaters Sept. 18. (tt stern-enzi)

DANCE: SUNSET SALONS: DANCE EVENING


The folks at Clifton Cultural Arts Center had a great idea four years ago and, since then, they’ve hosted a yearly series of Sunset Salons — “cheeky modern takes on Enlightenment salons” — for culturally invested adults. This September, the series opener is a Dance Evening. After civilized light bites and conversation for those assembled, the plan is to host distinguished regional dancers and choreographers in an interactive panel. Perhaps a flashmob? 6:30-9 p.m. Sept. 23. $15-$20. Clifton Cultural Arts Center, 3711 Clifton Ave., Clifton, 513-497-2860, cliftonculturalarts.org. (KV)

VISUAL ART: MYOPIA


This retrospective exhibition celebrates the art and music of the Akron-born Mark Mothersbaugh, a Rock visionary known for his role in creating the band Devo who also has been an active visual artist. His exhibit, Myopia at the Contemporary Arts Center, will feature prints, drawings, paintings, sculptures and more, including a series of postcard-sized works shown in its entirety. (Ahead of the exhibition, he will perform in concert on Aug. 28 at Woodward Theater; tickets are available through the CAC.) Sept. 25-Jan. 9, 2016. $7.50 adults; free for members. Contemporary Arts Center, 44 E. Sixth St., Downtown, contemporaryartscenter.org. (SR)

ONSTAGE: SILENCE! THE MUSICAL


Falcon Theater, situated in Newport, Ky., in its own small performance space, loves offbeat, “cult favorite” musicals, and it’s landed a doozy for this fall. Silence! The Musical is a parody of the very scary movie The Silence of the Lambs. The outrageous spoof was a huge hit at the New York Fringe Festival in 2005, and it’s had numerous productions since. Let’s just say that this show is as politically incorrect as possible with its story about a serial killer named Buffalo Bill. Falcon’s production is the show’s regional premiere. Sept. 25-Oct. 10. $15-$20. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Newport, Ky, falcontheatre.net. (RP)

FILM: SICARIO


Canadian-born director Denis Villeneuve earned a Foreign Language Oscar nomination for Incendies in 2011 and followed it up two years later with the solid one-two combination of Prisoners and Enemy (films that formed the cornerstone of the current Jake Gyllenhaal renaissance). This only elevates the stakes for Sicario, the story of an FBI agent (Emily Blunt) sent into the drug war along the no-man’s land border area between the U.S. and Mexico. The character-driven ensemble features Benicio Del Toro, Jon Bernthal, Josh Brolin, Jeffrey Donovan and Victor Garber. Where are you, Mr. Gyllenhaal? In theaters Sept. 25. (tts)

VISUAL ARTS: FRESH PAINT


Opening Manifest’s 12th season will be Fresh Paint, a competitive survey of contemporary painting of all types. Artists are selected from a call for entries. This show was first done in 2013 to inaugurate Manifest’s expanded galleries and was popular enough to now be a biennial project. There will also be two solo exhibitions at the same time. Sept. 25-Oct. 23. Free. Manifest Gallery, 2727 Woodburn Ave., East Walnut Hills, manifestgallery.org. 

(SR)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: STILL IN MOTION: EIGHTH BLACKBIRD


Chamber Music Cincinnati kicks off its season with the welcome return of eighth blackbird. An eighth blackbird concert is always cause for celebration, not to mention an opportunity to hear the works of cutting-edge composers. Their acoustic program features Bryce Dessner’s Folk-inspired “Murder Ballades,” Steve Reich’s “Piano/Phase” and the premiere of “Hand Eye” by Sleeping Giant, the wildly eclectic composers’ collective. All in a night’s work for eighth blackbird, which has a fondness for the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music, where members were grad students. The feeling is mutual. 8 p.m. Sept. 29. $25. Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village, University of Cincinnati, Clifton, cincychamber.org. (AA)

ONSTAGE: EXTREMITIES


Cincinnati Landmark Productions abandoned ship, the Showboat Majestic, in 2013, and built a brand-new theater in East Price Hill. Now they’re sailing into uncharted waters with William Mastrosimone’s 1982 drama, Extremities. It’s the searing story of a woman attacked in her home by a would-be rapist. She turns the tables on him and imprisons him in her fireplace. Her roommates are shocked by her plan: Should the attacker pay with his life? It’s a tense, revelatory story, not for the faint of heart — a daring choice for a theater company whose bread-and-butter has been family-friendly programming. Sept. 30-Oct. 18. $21-$24. Warsaw Federal Incline Theater, 801 Matson Place, East Price Hill, cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. (RP)

OCTOBER

ONSTAGE: SEX WITH STRANGERS


The Playhouse kicks off its Shelterhouse season with a recent — and provocatively titled — Broadway hit. Laura Eason’s playful script explores what transpires when private lives become public domain. Famous young blogger Ethan finds himself snowbound with the gifted but obscure middle-aged novelist Olivia. Their passion for each other is matched by their envy of the other’s career. As their literary futures become intertwined, the writers must confront the complications of reinventing themselves when the past is just a click away. This one is for grown-ups — who will have a lot of fun watching. Oct. 1-25. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, cincyplay.com. (RP)

FILM: THE WALK


With the success of James Marsh’s documentary Man on Wire (which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 2009) — a fascinating look at tightrope walker Philippe Petit’s daring (and quite illegal) high-wire performance between the World Trade Center towers in 1974 — it is hardly surprising that the story has now inspired a narrative feature by director Robert Zemeckis. Joseph Gordon-Levitt steps into the role of Petit, a charming French daredevil who stared into the cavernous urban abyss and kept right on moving. In theaters Oct. 2. (tts)

VISUAL ARTS: SUBLIME BEAUTY: RAPHAEL’S PORTRAIT OF A LADY WITH A UNICORN


Following its tactic of basing a show around one (or very few) borrowed masterpieces, Cincinnati Art Museum offers this rare chance to get close with a painting by the great Renaissance artist Raphael, who helped move naturalism in art forward with his mastery of his craft. The painting is on loan from Rome’s Galleria Borghese, and this is its first trip to the U.S. It travels to San Francisco next. Oct. 3-Jan. 3, 2016. Free admission. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams, cincinnatiartmuseum.org. (SR)

FILM: STEVE JOBS


It seems that quite soon, Ashton Kutcher’s turn as Apple’s revered godfather in Joshua Michael Stern’s Jobs will be little more than a footnote in the annals of film history. The definitive portrait will likely be Steve Jobs, from director Danny Boyle (Academy Award-winning director of Slumdog Millionaire) working from a screenplay by Aaron Sorkin (the Academy Award-winning screenwriter of The Social Network) based on Walter Isaacson’s book, with Michael Fassbender as Jobs, Seth Rogen as Steve Wozniak and Jeff Daniels as John Sculley. Could this be the role that finally leads to the anointing of Fassbender as the next great actor of his generation? In theaters Oct. 9. (tts)

VISUAL ARTS: HEROISM IN PAINT: A MASTER SERIES BY JACOB LAWRENCE


The late Jacob Lawrence is one of America’s greatest painters for the narrative sweep of his expressively rendered series, especially his 60-panel Migration that depicted the African-American move from the South. This features 41 tempera paintings about Haitian founder Toussaint L’Ouverture and his battle for liberation from slavery. Completed in 1938, it is Lawrence’s first series. Oct. 10-Jan. 17, 2016. $10 adults; $8 students and seniors. Taft Museum of Art, 316 Pike St., Downtown, taftmuseum.org. (SR)

ONSTAGE: PIPPIN


Long before his Wicked took over, Stephen Schwartz gave Broadway a musical fantasy about a young prince searching for the meaning in his existence. The show’s Tony Award-winning Broadway revival from 2013 is full of extraordinary acrobatics, wondrous magical feats and soaring songs, a mash-up of eye-popping Cirque du Soleil-styled performances and winning musical theater. Will Pippin choose a happy but simple life? Or will he risk everything for a singular flash of glory? Touring shows usually land at the Aronoff for two weeks; this one is here for just one. Don’t miss it. Oct. 13-18. $29-$107. Broadway in Cincinnati, Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cincinnatiarts.org. (RP)

ONSTAGE: BUYER AND CELLAR


Jonathan Tolins’ one-man show was a big Off-Broadway hit in 2013. It is a fantasy set in a mini-mall in Barbra Streisand’s basement in Malibu, Calif., stuffed with acres of memorabilia. Ensemble Theatre offers Cincinnati native and New York stage veteran Nick Cearley as out-of-work actor Alex More, who can’t pass up playing shopkeeper for one tough customer who doesn’t let anyone rain on her parade. In addition to his performance in this memorable comic role, Cearley is bringing “The Skivvies,” his musical act in underwear with Lauren Molina, to ETC for a weekend (Oct. 22-24) of post-performance humor and tunes. Oct. 13-Nov. 1. $28-$44. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, 1127 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, ensemblecincinnati.org. (RP)

FILM: BEASTS OF NO NATION


Having set the world on fire with his breakout effort at the helm of the first season of HBO anthology series True Detective, Cary Fukunaga turns his attention to Uzodinma Iweala’s novel about Agu (Abraham Attah), a child converted into a soldier in a civil war in an unnamed African country under the command of a harsh yet charismatic warrior (Idris Elba). The film has attracted attention for its potentially paradigm-shifting release schedule — with Netflix holding the worldwide distribution rights and simultaneously opening the film in theaters and online across its video-on-demand service. Such a plan might only be possible for a film featuring a hot writer-director, a budding international star and a visionary company willing to push the envelope (and an eager audience on the hook). In theaters Oct. 16 (initial release). (tts)

ONSTAGE: DEATH OF A SALESMAN


“Attention must be paid” to Arthur Miller’s award-winning American classic drama. In fact, that classic line comes from this Pulitzer Prize-winning tale of failure and success. Cincinnati Shakespeare Company has recruited the excellent Bruce Cromer to portray Willy Loman, a washed-up salesman who is still trying to make it big. In the land of the free, every man controls his own destiny and the right to try and achieve the elusive American Dream. But as his days grow shorter and the times tougher, Willy’s cherished dream for himself and his family seems pretty elusive. Oct. 16-Nov. 7. $14-$36. Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, 719 Race St., Downtown, cincyshakes.com. (RP)

DANCE: UBAHN FEST


Are you a fan of Popping, B-boy and All-Styles dance? Then you’ll want to know that Cincinnati’s underground music festival Ubahn Fest has added dance to the mix. Elementz, the Hip Hop-based youth center, and well-known performance group The Millennium Robots have collaborated to bring positive attention to street culture with “Heroes Rise,” a series of freestyle dance competitions known as “battles.” Set in Cincinnati’s scenic underground metro transit center, the all-ages, family-friendly competition should attract local street-style dancers as well as dancers from across the country. 3-9 p.m. Oct. l7. $20-$100. Metro’s Riverfront Transit Center, 220 Central Ave., Downtown, ubahnfest.com. (KV)

DANCE: DANCE TRAFFIC


Cincinnati’s School for Creative and Performing Arts, the world-class public arts school based in Over-the-Rhine, features the SCPA Dance Ensemble in Dance traFFic at the school’s Mayerson Theater. The 54 members include dancers from grades six through 12. Choreographers are faculty members Patricia Rozow, Sarabeth Swinehart, Daryl Bjoza and Ka-Ron Lehman with special guest choreographer Rebecca Rodriguez-Hodory, a former soloist with Cincinnati Ballet who’s recently been guesting as ballet mistress there. Oct. 22-24. School for Creative and Performing Arts, 108 W. Central Parkway, Over-the-Rhine, scpaballet.com. (KV)

FILM: SECRET IN THEIR EYES


The Internet Movie Database (IMDB) listing for Secret in Their Eyes, the new release from writer-director Billy Ray (Breach and Shattered Glass), references Eduardo Sacheri’s novel as a primary source of inspiration, but film fans in the know will certainly remember Juan José Campanella’s 2010 Best Foreign Language Academy Award winner. Shifting the setting from Argentina to the U.S., Ray focuses on a team of FBI investigators and the supervising district attorney assigned to them as they attempt to recover from the brutal murder of the child of a key team member. Nicole Kidman, Julia Roberts and Chiwetel Ejiofor seek to keep the secret safe. In theaters Oct. 23. (tts)

DANCE: LADY OF THE CAMELLIAS


Cincinnati Ballet stages Lady of the Camellias, based on Alexandre Dumas’ tragic tale of beauty and anguish, in October. Choreography is from Val Caniparoli, well-known here for his vibrant Nutcracker and other well-received works. The full-length ballet, set in 19th-century Paris, is challenging for dancers, but breathtaking for audiences. Beautiful costumes and a live performance of the score by Frederic Chopin from the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra make this a must-see for balletomanes. Oct. 23-24. $32 and up. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cballet.org. (KV)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: SIEGFRIED, ACT II


Queen City Chamber Opera continues its Wagner odyssey with Act II of Siegfried, the third installment of Wagner’s four-part Ring cycle. As singer and comedian Anna Russell wryly noted, this is where the god Wotan plays 20 Questions with the dwarf Mime. The show is produced in cooperation with the Wagner Society of Cincinnati. Artistic director and conductor Isaac Selya gets a terrific sound out of his ensemble of young musicians, but I hope he reins in the orchestra’s volume — last time, I emerged with a headache. Forewarned is forearmed. Or fore-eared. Oct. 23-25. $13-$32. Arts Center at Dunham, 945 Dunham Way, Price Hill, queencitychamberopera.com. (AA)

DANCE: DEAD CAN DANCE – THE DEAD WILL RISE!


Exhale Dance Tribe raises the dead (again!) during this year’s Halloween season, making a spooky debut at the Aronoff Center’s Jarson-Kaplan Theater. Exhale founders/artistic directors Missy Lay Zimmer and Andrew Hubbard are inventive choreographers, and the company dancers are accustomed to making the theater their own personal portal of the strange netherworld from which they come. Scream at a scary blend of ghoulish works mixing Contemporary and Jazz dance — and feel free to come in costume. 3 and 8 p.m. Oct. 24. $20-$30. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, exhaledancetribe.com. (KV)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: ZEN AND THE ART OF ART


As Halloween approaches, concert:nova takes on the specter of John Cage, who continues to be a provocative presence in the music world 23 years after his death. Cage’s music and his philosophy were grounded in his lifelong study of Zen Buddhism, and cellist Ted Nelson curates a program in collaboration with Zen priest, Punk musician and author Brad Warner. As concert:nova’s artistic director Ixi Chen writes, “Expect to be surprised, challenged and pissed off.” Just what Cage would love. 8 p.m. Oct. 27. $25. 20th Century Theater, 3021 Madison Road, Oakley, concertnova.com. (AA)

ONSTAGE: ANDY’S HOUSE OF [BLANK]


A show that got its start earlier this year in Serials!, Know Theatre’s episodic theater party, graduates to a full-fledged production of a Fringe Festival kind of show about unrequited love and what it means to change your world. Local writers (and sometimes musicians) Trey Tatum and Paul Strickland created this small-town, mystery-spot, time-travel musical about Andy, whose unusual store is part ever-changing emporium of oddities and part museum of unmailed love letters. When Andy’s old school crush comes back for her father’s funeral with a mysterious machine, things change. Or do they? Oct. 30-Nov. 14. $20. Know Theatre, 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, knowtheatre.com. (RP)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: DESTINY AND DANTE’S INFERNO


The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra will play the hell out of this music, led by Australian conductor Simone Young, who makes her Cincinnati debut. The program features two choral works by Brahms, “Schicksalslied (Song of Fate)” and “Nänie (Funeral Song),” and Franz Liszt’s “Dante Symphony,” a depiction of Dante and Virgil’s journey through the circles of Hell. The always-terrific May Festival Chorus sings Brahms. Oct. 30-31. $10-$107. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org. (AA)

NOVEMBER

VISUAL ARTS: AFTER THE MOMENT: REFLECTIONS ON ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE

Twenty-five years after the Contemporary Arts Center presented — and, in an infamously disgraceful episode in Cincinnati history, was prosecuted for — the Mapplethorpe retrospective The Perfect Moment, seven area curators will attempt to show how that show and the attempts to censor it affected and changed contemporary art. Curators are Matt Distel, Dennis Harrington, William Messer, Steven Matijcio, Maria Seda-Reeder, Yasmeen Siddiqui and Elizabeth Stirratt. Nov. 6-March 13, 2016. $7.50 adults; free for members. Contemporary Arts Center, 44 E. Sixth St., Downtown, contemporaryartscenter.org. (SR)

FILM: SPECTRE


Sam Mendes signs up for a second license to kill, helming the sequel to his record-breaking James Bond release (Skyfall) and a third outing with Daniel Craig (the two worked together on Road to Perdition). Once again exploring the hidden past of 007, Spectre reveals the connection between Bond (Craig) and the sinister organization SPECTRE that seems intent on picking up the world-domination plans that failed in Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace. Will this adventure mark the twilight of Bond? In theaters Nov. 6. (tts)

VISUAL ARTS: HIGH STYLE: TWENTIETH-CENTURY MASTERWORKS FROM THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM COSTUME COLLECTION


Cincinnati Art Museum’s fashion, costume and jewelry shows have been highlights, and this appears to be following suit. This one from the Brooklyn Museum’s costume collection, now part of the Metropolitan Museum’s holdings, includes 65 examples of fashions by such 20th-century European and American designers as Schiaparelli, Chanel, Dior, Givenchy and Charles James. Jan Reeder — the Met’s consulting curator for the Brooklyn Museum’s costume collection — will lecture on the show Dec. 6. Nov. 7-Jan. 24, 2016. Free admission. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams, cincinnatiartmuseum.org. (SR)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: CELESTIAL SIRENS


During the 15th and 16th centuries, convents became safe places for women musicians to perform. An account from the late 16th century describes these women as “such rare voices that they seem angelic, and like sirens, entice the nobility of Milan to go hear them.” Catacoustic Consort is never less than excellent, and this offering of music for women’s voices features the lirone, viol, Baroque harp and theorbo. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 13. $10-$25. St. Rose Church, 2501 Riverside Drive, East End, catacoustic.com. (AA)

DANCE: PERFORMANCE & TIME ARTS SERIES


Social justice and social change take center stage when local dancer and choreographer Diana L. Ford directs and curates the newest iteration of Contemporary Dance Theater’s Performance & Time Arts series (PTA), Cincinnati’s longest-running performance art series. Excerpts from Ford’s theatrical work-in-progress Welcome to America: There’s Gotta Be Something Better Than This Crap, will anchor the evening. Expect a diverse blend of music, dance, poetry and multimedia from a variety of local performers and artists of all stripes. Nov. 13-14. $8-$12. Contemporary Dance Theater, 1805 Larch Ave., College Hill, cdt-dance.org. (KV)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA PROJECT KICK-OFF


Under the leadership of Maestro Louis Langrée, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra has commissioned three concertos for orchestra this season. The first to be heard is by Sebastian Currier, whose compositions have been performed and recorded by the Berlin and New York Philharmonic orchestras, the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Seattle Symphony. Langrée conducts the program that also includes Bruch’s Violin Concerto performed by Renaud Capuçon and Tchaikovsky’s “Romeo and Juliet Overture-Fantasie.” Nov. 19-21. $10-$107. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org. (AA)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: THE MERRY WIDOW


Who needs an excuse to celebrate Paris? Franz Lehár’s operettas literally set the stage for what would emerge as American Musical Theater. The story of a wealthy widow who must marry to save her homeland from bankruptcy is just the pretext for lavish production numbers and elegant waltzes. Two members of the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music’s faculty make mainstage debuts: award-winning director Emma Griffin stages the proceedings and Aik Khai Pung leads the orchestral forces. Count on CCM for outstanding productions rivaling the professionals for a fraction of the price, and if you avoid opera because it’s in a foreign language, this is sung in English. No excuses! Nov. 19-22. $10-$35. Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village, University of Cincinnati, Clifton, ccm.uc.edu. (AA)

FILM: CAROL


Cincinnatians eagerly await the release of Carol, the new festival darling from indie filmmaker Todd Haynes featuring highly anticipated performances from Rooney Mara and Cate Blanchett. We will all find ourselves studying each and every frame of the film for familiar signs of the Queen City, certainly our sentimental choice for an Academy Award for its supporting role in this production. In theaters Nov. 20 (initial release). (tts)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: JENS LEKMAN LIVE WITH MYCINCINNATI AMBASSADOR ENSEMBLE


Swedish songwriter Jens Lekman teams up with a sextet of young Price Hill musicians from the award-winning MyCincinnati program to perform his own songs and arrangements by Van Dyke Parks and Eddy Kwon, the recently appointed head of MyCincinnati. 8 p.m. Nov. 20. $15-$20. Contemporary Arts Center, 44 E. Sixth St., Downtown, mycincinnatiorchestra.org. (AA)

VISUAL ARTS: AMERICAN SAMPLER: GRANDMA MOSES AND THE HANDICRAFT TRADITION


Grandma Moses (1860-1961) was a seamstress and began painting to great acclaim as a newly discovered folk artist when she was 78. (Arthritis had limited her ability to continue sewing.) This exhibition will explore the formal relationships between that painting and her earlier handicraft, along with offering other work that influenced her — early American quilts and samplers and also images from popular culture. It’s the final exhibition in the Dayton museum’s “Year of American Art.” Nov. 21-Feb. 21, 2016. $14; $11 students and seniors. Dayton Art Institute, 456 Belmonte Park N., Dayton, Ohio, daytonartinstitute.org. (SR)

FILM: CREED


When the announcement heralding the arrival of this production dropped, a sizeable critical contingent wondered, “WTF?!” Why was Ryan Coogler, the writing and directing darling of the Sundance hit Fruitvale Station, dragging that film’s rising star Michael B. Jordan into the spinoff-reboot world of Sylvester Stallone’s long-suffering boxing champion Rocky Balboa? Well, I have to say, this is exactly the kind of spinoff project I dream about. Creed turns its attention to Adonis Creed (Jordan), the son of former champ (and Rocky’s rival) Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers), and his efforts to emerge from his father’s ever-looming legacy. I’m willing to bet on Coogler and Jordan giving us something more than another punch-drunk boxer’s tale. In theaters Nov. 25. (tts)

DANCE: THE NUTCRACKER JAZZED UP!


Get an early start on holiday offerings with de la Dance Company’s annual trademark The Nutcracker Jazzed Up!. Co-directors Meridith Benson and Mario de la Nuez present this original take on The Nutcracker, incorporating Jazz arrangements of the Tchaikovsky score by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn. The fun reinterpretation has all the familiar characters from Drosselmeyer to Clara and her beloved Nutcracker doll. 8 p.m. Nov. 27-Dec. 5. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, deladancecompany.org. (KV)

DECEMBER

FILM: STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS


With Disney calling the shots after purchasing the beloved Star Wars franchise from creator George Lucas, they handed the keys to the first new installment to movie-fanboy J.J. Abrams — who has bounced from television (Alias and Fringe) to films (Mission: Impossible III and the two Star Trek reboots). Abrams has promised that his continuation of the saga of The Force would pick up 30 years after Return of the Jedi (with older versions of Luke, Han and Leia played by the original cast) and thankfully would not include any discussion of midi-chlorians. I don’t know about you, but that alone means I’m so there. In theaters Dec. 18. (tts)

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