Gov. Kasich Creates Fundraising Org for Potential Presidential Run

Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s campaign registered with the IRS a nonprofit April 20 called A New Day for America, officially setting up the fundraising organization for the Republican’s nascent presidential bid.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s campaign registered with the IRS a nonprofit April 20 called A New Day for America, officially setting up the fundraising organization for the Republican’s nascent presidential bid.

The so-called 527 group, named for the section of the IRS tax code that governs political campaign nonprofits, has some heavy hitters on its board, including former advertising executive and big-time GOP donor Philip Geier. U.S. Sen. John Sununu from New Hampshire, former Ohio House Speaker Jo Ann Davidson and two Columbus businessmen round out the board of the group.

It’s another big sign that Kasich is more or less set on running for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, though he has yet to formally announce that intention. Kasich has made the rounds recently, appearing on national political program Meet the Press April 19 and in New Hampshire at the NHGOP Leadership Summit April 18, where he spoke to 700 Republican Party members.

In both appearances, Kasich touted his potential as a presidential candidate, emphasizing his experience as governor of Ohio and his nearly two decades as a congressman. He told attendees in New Hampshire Saturday coyly, “Think about me, would you,” the Washington Post reported. “Don’t commit too soon.”
The GOP has plenty of other potential candidates to think about as well, however.

So far, Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Marco Rubio of Florida have all officially announced their campaigns. Others, including frontrunners former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, are expected to announce their bids as well.

Right now, Kasich lags behind all of them in terms of national presence and fundraising, but a big primary win in one of the early states like New Hampshire could boost his profile. He’ll have to somehow convince GOP primary delegates that he’s moderate enough to win a general election but also conservative enough to uphold strong conservative values.

He has competition on that front: Both Bush and Rubio exhibit some combination of staunch conservative policy positions and more moderate and practical beliefs, and both are already national players.

But both also have vulnerabilities: Rubio is on the outs with much of the party after backed an effort at comprehensive immigration reform. That has sunk him with the party’s far-right faction. Bush, meanwhile, struggles with the bad aftertaste from former President George W. Bush’s eight years in the White House.

Scroll to read more Cincinnati News articles
Join the CityBeat Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state.
Help us keep this coverage going with a one-time donation or an ongoing membership pledge.

Newsletters

Join CityBeat Newsletters

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.