Morning News and Stuff

Tucker's set to reopen this summer; early voting now open in Hamilton County; UC contemplates moving some programs downtown

click to enlarge Cincinnati PARK[ing] Day 2009.
Cincinnati PARK[ing] Day 2009.

Tucker's Restaurant in Over-the-Rhine is set to reopen on July 25 — exactly one year after a kitchen fire badly damaged the iconic restaurant. The diner first opened its doors in 1946 and has been a staple in the neighborhood for decades. Community volunteers are hosting a brunch fundraiser for the reopening at St. Francis Seraph School in OTR this Sunday. 

• Early voting is now open for Ohio's primary on March 15. Voters can now head down to Hamilton County Board of Elections to vote, which mght be a good idea to avoid long lines or obnoxious political junkies at the polls. The Board of Elections website also lets you look up whether you're actually registered to vote and where you can go to vote, if you feel like doing so on the actual day.

• The University of Cincinnati is thinking about expanding its campus into downtown. UC President Santa Ono said the university is considering moving its law, business and music programs to a new downtown campus in order to connect better with the city. The university has long discussed moving its law school in particular. Ono says the current building on the corner of Clifton Avenue and Calhoun Street that houses the school is in need of renovations. UC officials are still considering possibilities, so there's no solid word yet on whether any programs will actually move.

• The recent spike in heroin use reported in the greater Cincinnati area has caused another outbreak: Hepatitis C. The number of infections jumped in 2015 with more than 1,000 new reported cases, The Enquirer reports, which public health officials say goes hand-in-hand with injection drugs like heroin. About 75 percent of Hepatitis C cases result in severe liver problems. Public health officials are pushing needle exchange programs to help curb the rate of infection, and on Monday the Northern Kentucky Health Department got approval to develop its own exchange program.

• Ohio has created a $20 million program to help aid the clean up of abandoned gas stations. The Ohio Development Services Agency is in charge of handing out the grant money over the next two years to city land banks. The state is currently working on a website for applicants to apply online set to launch in March. Ohio Development Services Agency Director David Goodman said the idea for the program struck him when he noticed the number of small Ohio towns with an abandoned gas station in the middle. These properties can also have issues with oil and gas leaks from leftover underground tanks.

• Apple CEO Tim Cook has vowed to fight against a court order from a federal court issued Tuesday that would require the company to build software allowing law enforcement to bypass security functions on its products. Law enforcement officials sought the order to gain access to the iPhone of Syed Rizwan Farook, one of the attackers in the December shooting at an office building in San Bernardino, Calif., that left 14 dead. Apple has long resisted building "back door" access software, saying if such technology exists it could further compromise the security of its users by making it easier for hackers to bypass security features. Cook called the court order "chilling" and claimed the government is basically asking the company for build a master key for all iPhones in order to unlock one.

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