Morning News and Stuff

Developer's plans for northern OTR expand; Ohio congressman flips, now supports women's right to choose; why we love cars so dang much

Morning all. Here’s what’s happening around town today.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear would like to see the looming effort to replace the Brent Spence Bridge, currently estimated to cost $2.6 billion, trimmed by $300 million, they said yesterday in a news conference. That will be a tall order, Kentucky transportation officials say, but something they’ll work on. Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Secretary Mike Hancock says it’s hard to find immediate and obvious reductions to the project.

Part of the problem with cost-trimming is that the current bridge accommodates 160,000 cars a day, much more traffic than it was originally intended to carry. The solution engineers have in mind would mean building a bigger, wider bridge next to the Brent Spence. It would also mean highway-widening and interchange updates along an eight-mile stretch on both the Ohio and Kentucky sides of the bridge. Those highway changes account for 60 percent of the project’s costs. Officials say they will look at tightening the scope of the project and also finding ways to do what needs to be done for less money.

One lynchpin of the governors’ plan is that it will be partially funded by tolling, a controversial solution. Vocal opponents of tolls in Northern Kentucky, including many elected officials, have vowed to fight against tolling on the bridge, saying it will put a burden on businesses and workers. They say the project is unnecessarily large and that both states should approach the federal government in an attempt to get funding for a smaller, more modest project to replace the bridge.

• A local developer's vision for the area around Findlay Market in Over-the-Rhine has expanded. Model Group, which has already bought up a number of buildings in the area with plans to renovate them into office and commercial space, is making moves to purchase several more neighboring buildings on Race and West Elder streets. Model recently bought 101 W. Elder, 1812 Race St. and is in the final stages of purchasing 1818 Race St., all apartment buildings with first-floor retail space. It is also looking to purchase 1808 and 1810 Race St. soon. It is unclear if these buildings are currently occupied or represent affordable housing in the neighborhood. The expansion brings the developer’s first phase of development from $14 million to $19 million. The expansion creates a big increase in residential space — 35 units instead of 14 in the original first phase of the project, as well as 50,000 square feet of retail space instead of 40,000.

• An Ohio congressman and former pro-life advocate says he has changed his mind about abortion. Rep. Tim Ryan was one of just a few Democrats in the House who had opposed abortion, in part due to his Catholic faith. Over his 14-year career, Ryan has been an outspoken opponent of abortion but says his views have changed over time, writing in an op-ed in the Akron Beacon Journal: “I have come to believe that we must trust women and families — not politicians — to make the best decision for their lives." Another factor in his change of heart may be that he’s eyeing Republican Rob Portman’s Senate seat in 2016.

• As we talked about a few days ago, it seems increasingly likely that Ohio voters will get to weigh in on a ballot initiative legalizing marijuana in November. But if you ask Attorney General Mike DeWine, that’s just dumb. DeWine called legalization “a stupid idea.” DeWine said something esoteric about the law being a teacher before basically telling folks at a Rotary Club meeting in Newark Tuesday that legalizing weed will have everyone and their mom smoking the stuff all the time because the law says they should, creating chaos in the streets, stunning increases in demand for Bonnaroo tickets and long lines for snack products (OK, he didn’t go that far, but you could tell he was thinking it).

Beyond that, DeWine did have some pretty fair points to make about a leading proposal by ResponsibleOhio, which has presented one of the ballot initiatives. That initiative would allow anyone over 21 who passes a background check to buy weed, but would limit the number of growers in Ohio to 10 and create a seven-member Marijuana Control Commission to oversee production and sale of the crop. Who chooses growers and the commission is unclear. Sound like a monopoly? Yeah. DeWine thinks so too, and actually made a pretty cogent point about that.

"Even if you think selling marijuana is a great idea, I don't know why anyone would think just giving a few people who are going to put the money up to pass it on the ballot is a good idea to let them have that monopoly," DeWine said.

So can we just legalize weed and have it all operate like every other large monopolistic business in the country instead of a state-anointed monopolistic business, like, say, our casinos? Stay tuned…

• As a bike commuter and die-hard pedestrian, this UrbanCincy opinion piece on how car-centric and bike/pedestrian/eyeball/everything-else unfriendly many Cincinnati-area Kroger stores are really resonates. With either updates, new stores needed or on the slate in Walnut Hills, Over-the-Rhine, Avondale and Corryville, it’s a good time to think about how our grocery stores should operate and who they’re designed to serve. This is an especially salient point in light of the problems many Cincinnatians have living in food deserts. UrbanCincy editor Randy Simes makes a great point in the piece about how other cities, namely Lexington, have gotten more urban-friendly, modern designs that serve motorists, cyclists and pedestrians equally well. Why not here?

• Finally, as we think about billion-dollar bridges and oceans of grocery store parking lots, I leave you with this: the Washington Post’s WonkBlog a couple days ago had a really interesting piece on the roots of America’s "love affair" with the automobile. Spoiler alert: It’s all been a big marketing campaign, the author says. Worth a read for the history of America’s car culture, highway system and shout out to Cincinnati’s pre-I-75 West End.

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