Morning News and Stuff

Report says streetcar might run at a deficit; federal judge issues restraining order against Mike DeWine's Planned Parenthood lawsuit; Pete Rose won't be reinstated by MLB

click to enlarge Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine
Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine

Good morning! Here are your morning headlines. 

• The streetcars are arriving one by one in Cincinnati, slowly parading around the city to get ready for their debut in the second half of 2016, but a new report released by the project's financial advisor says the cars might also be dragging in some money problems behind them. The report by Davenport and Co. says the city could be more than $1 million short during its first year. The company ran four different scenarios weighing all of the streetcars funding sources — fares, advertising, reduced tax incentives for developers, parking meters and a back-up of nearly $1 million from the Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation — and estimated deficits ranging from $830,000 to $1.4 million by 2017. They estimated a deficit between $495,000 and $2.4 million in 2021. Vice Mayor David Mann, a streetcar supporter, wasn't phased by the report, saying the city could handle the deficits the streetcar brings. 

• The city has released a plan to help end some of the city's food deserts. Right now certain parts of Avondale, Bond Hill, Evanston, Northside and Fairmount are among the neighborhoods that struggle the most to offer access to fresh foods. The city is launching the Grocery Attraction Pilot Program to try to fill in some of those grocery store holes in the city by offering incentives such as tax abatements and waiving the city's annual food permit fee for up to give year for new and future grocers operating in those areas. The Clifton Market in Clifton, the proposed Apple Street Market in Northside and grocery stores in Avondale would qualify for the program. Council's Neighborhoods Committee passed it on Monday, and it could go in front of Council for a full vote on Wednesday. In order to quality, the stores would have to hit certain benchmarks designated by the feds: at least 6,000 square feet, operate in an area where at least one-third of residents live more than a mile from a grocery store and where the census track shows a poverty rate of at least 20 percent or a family median income that is 80 percent or less of Cincinnati's average. 

• Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine won't get his hands on Planned Parenthood for at least 28 days now, at least according to U.S. District Court Judge Edmund Sargus, who issued a temporary restraining order for the health clinic Monday. DeWine has asserted that Planned Parenthood clinics in Cincinnati and Columbus have improperly disposed of fetal parts and says the requirement that fetuses are disposed in a "humane" way might be "vague." DeWine hoped to sue to stop the clinics from disposing of fetal parts, but Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit against his office and the Ohio Department of Health on Sunday. Planned Parenthood's Cincinnati-based attorney, Al Gerhardstein, said that the organization has been properly disposing of fetal parts for more than 40 years and that DeWine is now changing the rules on them. 

• Along the same lines, several other Ohio Republican lawmakers have argued that aborted fetuses should be cremated and buried instead of disposed in a landfill. In a proposal that was started a month before DeWine's allegations, Sen. Joe Uecker (R-Miami Township), Reps. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon) and Kyle Koehler (R-Springfield) want to change the way the clinics dispose of fetal tissue and are proposing that a woman who has an abortion can choose on a form whether or not she prefers cremation or burial. The disposal method would be an alternative to the use of medical waste companies, which heat and sanitize the remains before dumping them in a landfill. The proposal comes after Indiana and Arkansas passed similar laws earlier this year.  

• It was a sad day for hometown hero Pete Rose yesterday. Major League Commissioner Rob Manfred informed the former Cincinnati Reds player verbally and in writing that he would not lift the permanent ban Major League Baseball placed on him 25 years ago. Rose has been banned since 1989 for betting on games while he was the Reds' manager.  

• It's been nearly a year since President Barack Obama made the big announcement that the U.S. and Cuba would begin repairing their broken relationship. The Dec. 17, 2014 announcement led to the opening of the doors of an American embassy in Havana and inspired new dreams of beach vacations for Americans, who were previously banned from going there for tourism. So how much has the country really changed in the last year? Well, U.S. businesses have only secured a few deals and Cuba remains a one-party state, but while business has been slow to take off, U.S. tourism has increased 40 percent. But the change has also led more Cubans to flee the country than in previous years. Since the big announcement last December, more than 43,000 Cuban migrants to the U.S, up from less than 25,000 in 2014.

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