Morning News and Stuff

Police Chief Blackwell addresses city council on police body cameras; Cranley opposes changes to the city's charter; Kasich's smug run for president?

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell
Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell

Hey everyone! Hope you all had a great weekend! I know I tried to spend as much time outside as possible, but now it's back to work, and here are your morning headlines.  

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell spoke to City Council today about his plan to bring body cameras to the University of Cincinnati police department. The program is estimated to cost $1.5 million dollars and the department would like to obtain 60 cameras. The push for body cameras for the Cincinnati police comes in the wake of the release of University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing's body camera footage, which shows the fatal shooting of Samuel DuBose during a July 19 traffic stop in Mount Auburn. Chief Blackwell stated in a press conference following the release of the footage and announcement of the indictment of the officer that body cameras were on the way for Cincinnati police, but he did not give a time frame for when the program could begin.

• Details of a settlement between the estate of David "Bones" Hebert and the City of Cincinnati were released over the weekend. We first told you about the settlement Friday after the Cincinnati Enquirer reported a portion of that settlement. Hebert's estate will get $187,000 from the city, but more important, say his advocates, is a city acknowledgement that police acted improperly in his shooting death. Hebert was killed by Cincinnati police in Northside in 2011
after officers responded to a 911 call alleging an intoxicated man was robbed by Hebert and assaulted with a pirate sword. Hebert was located sitting on a sidewalk on Chase Avenue in Northside about 10 minutes later. During subsequent questioning, officers said Hebert drew a knife and moved toward an investigating officer, causing Mitchell to believe the officer’s life was in danger. Mitchell shot Hebert twice, killing him. Initial investigations cleared Mitchell of wrongdoing, but other reviews found he acted outside of police protocol, getting too close to Hebert and not formulating a plan for engaging him. Friends of Hebert have since made efforts to clear his name, saying he was a non-violent person caught in the wrong place at the wrong time. His advocates have set up a website, friendsofbones.org, to present evidence in the case.

"On July 30, the City of Cincinnati, four of its police officers and the Estate of David “Bones” Hebert agreed to settle the civil rights action pending in federal court," the city said in a statement. "Initial reports issued regarding the incident in 2011 declared that Mr. Hebert attacked a police officer with an opened knife or sword.  There was no sword. Furthermore, while an opened knife was recovered at the scene, the evidence that Mr. Hebert intended to attack or swipe at a police officer was not conclusive. Instead, Mr. Hebert’s actions, as well as actions taken by the officers on scene, contributed to the use of deadly force.  The City regrets this unfortunate loss of life and again expresses its condolences to the family and those who cared for Mr. Hebert.  This lawsuit, and now its resolution, should provide confidence that the matter was fully investigated and that a fair resolution was reached to this tragic event."

• Six people were arrested during a march remembering Samuel Dubose, who was shot July 18 by University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing. You can read our coverage of the vigil and march here.

• Mayor John Cranley opposes a measure that would weaken his power as mayor. Four amendments to the city's charter proposed by the City Council-appointed Charter Review Task Force would include one that would stop Cranley's ability to kill ordinances without a city council hearing or vote. Another would give the city council majority power to initiate the firing of the city manager, which only the mayor can do now, and kill the use of a pocket veto, which Cranley used to veto certain items in the 2016 budget. Cranley has to approve and send the ordinances to City Council, which could vote to put them on the ballot as early as next week, but the mayor has such strong opposition to the amendments that the committee many reconsider them altogether after a year of putting them together. Cranley has stated that he'd like a little more in return for losing some of his power and declined to forward the ordinances to the Rules and Audit Committee this week.   

• School districts in Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties are uniting against state-mandated testing. Forty-one districts part of the Greater Cincinnati School Advocacy Network want more local control and less "burdensome" mandates. Mason City Schools spokeswoman Tracey Carson said not all school districts are equal and needs vary between rural, suburban and rural school districts. The most recent state budget will cut $78 million from Ohio's education budget. 

• Two weeks after Gov. John Kasich's announcement that he's running for president, Newsweek has published an article on the GOP presidential hopeful's smugness. The article points out several issues so far with Kasich's big run for Washington D.C., including his reported short fuse, questionable claims of a 2014 "landslide" victory for governor and the fact that, well, most Americans don't even know who Kasich is and many Ohioans don't even like him. According to a recent poll, Kasich is number eight in line for the GOP nomination with Donald Trump leading the poll.

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