Morning News and Stuff

UC hold conference on race, policing; Museum Center had huge year in 2015; Kasich casts himself as compassionate conservative in GOP debate

click to enlarge Union Terminal
Union Terminal

Hey hey all! Here’s what’s going on around town today.


The University of Cincinnati is hosting a two-day national conference on race and policing starting today. The conference comes in the wake of the July 19 police shooting of Samuel DuBose by UC police officer Ray Tensing. DuBose was unarmed when Tensing stopped him for a missing front license plate. Tensing ended up shooting DuBose and has been indicted on murder charges for his death. The conference will feature panels and talks by national experts on policing and race issues as well as talks by Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac, former Cincinnati City Manager Valerie Lemme and others. Sessions on police profiling, challenges to trusting law enforcement, gun policy and other issues will also be offered. A UC student group called UC Students Against Injustice, meanwhile, has planned a protest of the event, calling it a “PR stunt” in light of what they say are failures by the university to make substantive changes following DuBose’s death.

• One of the region’s most iconic and beloved museums had a banner year in 2015. The Cincinnati Museum Center, housed in historic Union Terminal, had its second-busiest year since it opened in 1990, attracting nearly 1.5 million visitors last year. And it saved the best for last: It also had its single busiest month in December, when 224,000 people streamed through its doors. Museum officials credit popular temporary exhibits like the Lego-themed “The Art of the Brick” and “Mummies of the World” — along with the center’s permanent exhibits — for the success. The good news for the museum comes as Union Terminal prepares to undergo an extensive two-year restoration.

• Yesterday we told you Cincinnati City Councilman and aspirant to the U.S. Senate P.G. Sittenfeld was holding a news conference in Columbus to announce a big idea on gun control, a key issue for his Senate campaign. Well, here are the deets — Sittenfeld wants to pass an amendment to the Ohio constitution that would allow cities to make their own gun laws, meaning that places like Cincinnati could pass tighter restrictions on guns as long as they were within the scope of state and federal laws. The amendment would also allow cities like Cleveland to reinstate bans on assault weapons that were overturned by the Ohio Supreme Court in 2006. The drivers behind Sittenfeld’s call for the amendment are two-fold. One, he used yesterday’s announcement to criticize Republican lawmakers who recently expanded the places concealed carry license holders can have their guns to include places like college campuses and daycare facilities. He’s also made the move to further illustrate differences between himself and his primary opponent, former Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland. Sittenfeld has drawn attention to past pro-gun votes by Strickland.

• Online voting registration may soon be an option for some Ohioans, but only for those with a valid Ohio driver’s license. Legislation setting up online registration not requiring signed paperwork is making its way through the Ohio state house and has bipartisan support. Lawmakers are hoping to get the bill passed in time for it to go into effect before the Oct. 11 deadline for the November election, but some conservative groups say it should be held until 2017 so online security issues can be vetted to prevent hacking. The Ohio House of Representatives is next to vote on the bill, which would go into effect 90 days after it is passed.

• One in four children under the age of six is food insecure in Ohio and the state is 38th in the country when it comes to childhood poverty, a new study says. The Ohio Children’s Defense Fund conducted the study, which found that 653,000, or 24 percent, of Ohio kids don’t get enough to eat. That sets poor children up for learning and development challenges that can linger for years, the organization says. OCDF says efforts like school lunch programs and other initiatives that help low-income people are vital to fixing that problem, and has pushed lawmakers to do more to expand those programs.

• Finally, did Ohio Gov. John Kasich shine in his first Trump-less debate last night? Well, not so much, but he also didn’t crash and burn either. Kasich mostly ignored addressing traditionally hard-right primary voters in the debate’s host state Iowa, which has a Feb. 1 primary looming. Instead, he spent much of his time sending a more pragmatic and even friendly message, a move pundits think is calibrated to woo New Hampshire’s less ideologically-hidebound conservatives set to cast their own primary vote Feb. 9. Kasich again tried on the compassionate conservative routine last night, pulling out his best lines about the ways biblical scripture have informed his stance on the need to help the needy. Kasich also said that speedy action would have been the best response to the ongoing crisis with Flint, Mich.'s lead-polluted water scandal.


If you just read the blurb above about childhood poverty, know about the lead crisis in Sebring, Ohio, are familiar with the state's economic performance or the way Kasich’s administration deals out food stamp work waivers, that probably sounds a little disingenuous. But then, welcome to the world of politics. By comparison, the rest of the GOP field had a pretty rowdy night, even absent Trump. U.S. Sens Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, along with former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, tangled over immigration, which is shaping up to be a huge issue among xenophobes, err, I mean GOP primary voters. Most of the other candidates faded into the background, with Cruz and Rubio getting the most airtime — 13 minutes of speaking time a piece. Kasich came in at a respectable 9 minutes, though mostly avoided tangling with or being addressed by the other candidates. Trump, meanwhile, still leads in the polls despite skipping the debate in protest.

That’s it for me. Twitter. E-mail. You know the drill. It’s supposed to be really nice this weekend, so give me tips on your favorite off-the-radar long bike ride route. I’m out!

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