Morning News and Stuff

Go vote; go vote; go vote

Hey all! Did you play the lottery… err, I mean, uh, engage in the completely unproblematic and entirely functional democratic process today? There’s still time! And if you need some perspective on the issues from your friendly, cynical but also well-read alt weekly editorial board, we’ve got it right here. Really quickly, we suggest voting yes on Issue 1, no on both Issues 2 and 3, no on Issue 22 and yes on Issues 23 and 24. If you're in Northern Kentucky, we've endorsed gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway, so consider throwing a vote his way. Want to know more? Click away.

Speaking of elections, there were problems reported at some Cincinnati voting precincts this morning. Some reported technical difficulties with electronic voting equipment in Madisonville, Evanston, Anderson Township, Mount Lookout, Colerain Township and other locations where new electronic voting devices were in use. Did you experience difficulties voting? Let us know in the comments or via e-mail. We’re on it.

• One interesting thing that’s come up around voting: Photos of pro-Issue 22 signage at polling places are popping up on social media. Election rules state that signage endorsing candidates isn’t allowed at polling places, and it would seem to follow that similar prohibitions exist for issues. Councilman Chris Seelbach, a vocal opponent of the parks tax proposed by Mayor John Cranley, posted to Facebook photos of posters promoting the amendment to Cincinnati’s charter tacked up behind poll workers at a voting precinct in Mount Adams. Reports of other polling locations with similar signage have been floating around the social media realm as well.

• Also speaking of elections, did you catch this pro-Issue 3 ad featuring former 98 Degrees singer and hometown reality TV star Nick Lachey? He’s hyped on the weed legalization amendment currently before voters, and he wants to tell you all about it in the 30-second TV spot. Well, maybe not ALL about it. Issue 3 critics point out that the commercial fails to mention the fact that Lachey is an investor in the amendment effort, and as such, is part-owner in one of the 10 grow sites that would be exclusively allowed to grow commercial weed if the amendment passes. And while Lachey starts off the ad by saying Ohio is his home, the ad also neglects to mention that he isn’t registered to vote for the amendment in Ohio because he lists California as his primary state of residence. Issue 3 creators ResponsibleOhio say those omissions aren’t a big deal, and that the point of the ad is that the amendment would reform unjust drug laws, create millions in tax revenues and more than 1,000 jobs.

• Here’s a final election note: If you’re the type who loves the horse-race aspect of election day and want to spend all day on the edge of your seat about whether voters have given you the green light to spend your green on some green (wow that’s obnoxious sorry), here are some handy tips for forecasting whether that’s in the cards. Mostly, it’s common sense stuff: watch districts that have demographics that generally skew heavily pro- and anti-marijuana legalization and see how the balance is tipping out.

• Onward to other issues. Former Mahogany’s owner Liz Rogers made her first $800 payment to the city today. That payment was part of a settlement after Rogers’ restaurant at The Banks folded last fall. In 2012, Rogers was given a $684,000 grant and a $300,000 loan by the city, which actively recruited her to open her restaurant at the riverfront development in order to increase diversity there. Mahogany’s was the only minority-owned business at The Banks, and Rogers has said that other promised amenities there, including a large hotel that would have increased customer base, never materialized. Rogers eventually fell behind on her loan payments, as well as state taxes, forcing the closure of the restaurant amid a firestorm of controversy. Rogers is now working on paying back the city $100,000. Other businesses at The Banks and elsewhere have received similar grants and loans, Rogers’ supporters point out. Other businesses have also faltered at The Banks, including Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar, which abruptly closed up shop recently.

• Finally, $1.3 million can buy a lot of things. We’re talking multiple Maybachs. Healthcare for a year for a bunch of folks. Probably about a mile of highway repairs or something. Or, if you’re Ohio, it buys you a couple years of stubborn obstinacy against the tides of history. Yep, that’s right. Ohio owes that amount in legal fees related to Attorney General Mike DeWine’s fight to uphold Ohio’s same-sex marriage ban, which the Supreme Court struck down in a historic decision this summer. The truly crazy part? That $1.3 million is just the amount courts say the state owes attorneys who fought on behalf of the same-sex couples to whom the state was denying marriage licenses. It doesn’t include the state’s own legal expenses. Your tax dollars at work. To be fair, the AG is charged with upholding the state's laws, even when they're under fire in federal courts. But on the other hand, Kentucky's AG declined to fight a similar legal battle on behalf of his state's anti-same-sex marriage laws.

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