Morning News and Stuff

Parking privatization deal reached, rape flier case could be unsealed, casino revenue drops

Making cash, spending cash
Making cash, spending cash

The city of Cincinnati and its largest city employees union have

reached a deal

regarding the privatization of the city’s parking assets. Under the deal’s terms, the city will give raises and not lay off anyone for three years, but only if the city’s parking assets are privatized. However, the head of a Clifton community group is

still not happy with the privatization plan

. He says the plan is bad for business because it limits the amount of affordable parking in the area. But would

laying off 344 city employees

be better for business?

The identity of the Miami University student who put up the infamous “Top Ten Ways to Get Away with Rape” flier may soon be revealed. The Ohio Supreme Court will decide by Dec. 14 whether the case should be

unsealed and open to public view

. Robert Lyons, the Butler County part-time judge who sealed the case, has faced scrutiny in the past few months for conflicts of interest regarding drinking-and-driving cases.

Revenue from casinos in Toledo and Cleveland is

dropping

. The numbers paint a bad picture for Cincinnati and Hamilton County officials expecting budget problems to be solved by casino revenue.

A proposal mandating drug testing for welfare recipients in Ohio

resurfaced last week

. Republican legislators claim the requirement will save the state money, but a similar proposal in Florida

added to budget woes

as the state was forced to pay for drug tests.

Ohio’s ultra-wealthy population is

growing

. About 1,330 Ohioans are worth $30 million or more, an increase of 2 percent since 2011, according to a report from Wealth-X. The news could shape Gov. John Kasich’s plan to cut the income tax using revenue from a higher oil-and-gas severance tax, perhaps encouraging state officials to make the cut

more progressive

.

Gov. Kasich is

ending the practice

of giving so many tax credits to keep businesses in Ohio. The move could potentially cost the state jobs as businesses move to other areas with bigger, better incentives, but state officials and the business community don’t seem too worried for now.

If the Ohio government agencies were forced to cut their budgets by 10 percent, the

results

would not be pretty. The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction would have to close prisons, and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources would have a tougher time enforcing new regulations on fracking.

Ohio’s exotic animal law is facing

a challenge in federal court

today. Exotic animal owners claim the law violates their First Amendment and property rights by forcing them to join private associations and give up their animals without compensation. They also do not like the provision that requires microchips be implanted into the animals. The Humane Society of the United States is defending the law, which was passed after a man

released 56 exotic animals and killed himself in 2011

.

An Ohio court said a business tax on fuel sales

must be used on road projects

.

Ohio gas prices are

still dropping

.

The cure for leukemia could be a modified version of the AIDS virus

.
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