Morning News and Stuff

Cincy could get fed money for tech jobs; someone flew a drone into Great American Tower; will Kasich get called off the bench?

click to enlarge Watch it with that drone, man
Watch it with that drone, man

Good morning all. I dunno about you, but I’m pretty drowsy today after too much mid-week fun last night. But we’re going to push through together and get this news thing taken care of, right? Right. Here’s what’s up today.

Cincinnati is one of 10 more cities newly eligible for more than $100 million in federal grants aimed at getting folks with employment barriers trained to work in the tech industry. The city’s designation as part of the White House’s TechHire Initiative means the city can apply for that money to fund innovative programs with local partners that seek to increase the number of tech workers in the region, a big issue here. Currently, there are somewhere around 1,600 unfilled tech positions in the Greater Cincinnati area, and some industry experts expect that number to skyrocket in the coming decade. City officials say they hope to use the TechHire designation to get 300 Cincinnatians into tech jobs, especially city residents who have a hard time finding job training and work due to issues with child care, language barriers and disabilities.

• Watch where you’re flying that drone, bro. An unknown person yesterday flew one of the unmanned aircrafts into the Great American Tower in what I can only imagine was an attempt to pluck that dumb tiara off the building and dump it into the Ohio River. The drone was unsuccessful at that presumed task, however, and managed only to break a window. Glass fell onto the building’s parking garage, but no one was hurt. Flying a drone around downtown is illegal, though I hope someday in the near future our civic leaders will carve out an exception to that rule so I can have drones deliver pizza to my office window.

• In the aftermath of the July 19 University of Cincinnati police shooting of Samuel Dubose, UC has created a new position to help oversee the school’s police department. Vice President of Safety and Reform Robin Engel has spent two decades working with and studying police, UC officials say, and is the best person to lead the school’s police reform initiatives during the current crisis. You can find out more about Engel and her background in this story, which outlines the major challenges she faces ahead. One issue: the increase in traffic tickets given by UC cops, especially off-campus, and the pervasive racial inequity of those tickets. In four years, the number of tickets given by UC cops has risen from 286 to 932, and the share of those tickets going to blacks has gone from 43 to 62 percent.

• A year ago today, John Crawford III was shot to death by Beavercreek police officer Sean Williams in a Walmart there as he carried a toy rifle over his shoulder. Crawford was black and Williams was white. At the time, such shootings were an important, but tiny, blip on the nation’s radar. How times have changed. The police shooting death of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown by Ferguson, Mo. police officer Darren Wilson five days later brought national attention to the issue, sparking deep unrest in the St. Louis satellite and around the country. Other shootings, including the recent death of Samuel Dubose at the hands of University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing, have kept the issue front and center in the national spotlight. Now, a year after Crawford’s shooting, a federal investigation into his death continues and has yet to yield many new details. Rallies and gatherings are planned tonight at Courthouse Square in downtown Dayton at 7 p.m. and at the Beavercreek Walmart where Crawford died at 6 p.m. Crawford’s family will be appearing at the Dayton event.

• Finally, Gov. John Kasich got some good news yesterday. Over the past few weeks, when I picture Kasich, I picture an eager high school third-string quarterback on the sidelines beseeching coach to put him in the game. In this scenario, “coach” is the GOP and “the game” is of course the 2016 GOP presidential nomination contest. Yesterday, Kasich got word that he should suit up and start doing some warm ups, because he’s being called onto the field.

The Ohio guv made the cut for the first of six pre-primary debates, which takes place in Cleveland tomorrow. Kasich and U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky both eeked into the event, which has been limited to 10 slots. Kasich just edged past former Texas governor Rick Perry, who will stay at home in the Lone Star State, probably eating brisket and gazing longingly toward Cleveland. Just kidding. No one gazes longingly toward Cleveland. In any event, Kasich’s campaign announcement two weeks ago certain gave him a small boost — he’s now polling at about 3 percent, much better than the 1 percent he was at before he launched — but he’s still got a lot of work to do to catch up to GOP heavy-hitters former Florida governor Jeb Bush, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, and surprise quasi-frontrunner real estate magnate Donald Trump. Thursday’s debate may be a good chance for him to further set himself apart from the crowded field. Will Kasich’s surge continue? Will he pull off some kind of Rudy-esque triumph and make it to the big game? I would say the odds are long, but everyone loves an underdog.

Scroll to read more News Feature articles
Join the CityBeat Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state.
Help us keep this coverage going with a one-time donation or an ongoing membership pledge.

Newsletters

Join CityBeat Newsletters

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.