Morning News and Stuff

UC reaches multi-million dollar settlement with DuBose family; Cincinnati's magnet schools are attracting less African American students; Vice Mayor Mann to introduce ordinance to prevent wage theft

Vice Mayor David Mann
Vice Mayor David Mann

Good morning, Cincinnati! Here are your Monday morning headlines. 

• The family of Samuel DuBose and the University of Cincinnati have reached a settlement for the July 19 death of DuBose by UC police officer Ray Tensing. The university will pay the family $4,850,000 as well as pay the tuition and fees for DuBose's 12 children at UC, which will cost an estimated $500,000. That brings the total value of the settlement to $5.3 million. The university also said they are working to establish a memorial to DuBose on campus. UC President Santa Ono issued an apology to the family on behalf of the UC community. 

• Part of the reason Cincinnati's magnet schools were opened was to give the city's high African American students more opportunities for a good education. But an analysis of school records from 2007 to 2015 by WCPO has found that following a U.S. Supreme Court decision banning racial quotas, these magnet schools have just gotten whiter and whiter. CPS has long seen the test scores and graduation rates of African-American and Hispanic student lag behind their white peers, and most recently did away with the first-come, first-serve policy for the Fairview-Clifton German Language School that turned the school's front lawn into a campground for mostly white, wealthier families who had time available off work. The school now uses an expanded lottery. 

• Vice Mayor David Mann is planning to introduce an ordinance in the next few days that would help prevent wage theft for those who work for developers getting financial incentives from the city. The ordinance would allow the city to recover wages and forbid companies from doing business with the city for a certain amount of time if the city or another agency finds them guilty of wage theft. The proposed legislation would apply to developers getting more than $25,000 in loans, tax abatements or grants from the city.  

• St. Rita's School for the Deaf has announced it is ending its annual festival. School officials cited issues with costs and staffing as reasons for discontinuing the popular event, which would have had its 100-year anniversary this year. St. Rita Fest started in 1916, a year after the school opened, as a visiting fair for family members to visit their students at the school. School officials also said the school's grand raffle, a fundraiser that pulled in nearly $200,000 for the school last year, also contributed to the decision to close the fair. 

• Gov. John Kasich, still running hard for the GOP presidential nomination, has received the backing of three New Hampshire papers. The Nashua Telegraph, Foster's Daily Democrat and the Portsmouth Herald have all endorsed the GOP presidential hopeful for president. Kasich has also received endorsements from Ohio's Republican party, Ohio U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, and Ohio House speaker Cliff Rosenberger. 

Hilary Clinton attacked Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on his policy shifts on gun policy and universal healthcare last night during the fourth Democratic debate in Charleston, S.C. Sunday evening. Clinton aligned herself with President Obama and accused Sanders of flip flopping on his positions regarding some of the nation's hottest issues right now. Clinton's more aggressive tactics this debate probably comes as Sanders is nearly neck-and-neck with her polls as the New Hampshire and Iowa primaries draw very, very close. 

Email me at [email protected] with story tips! It's going to be a chilly week. Stay warm Cincinnati!

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