Morning News and Stuff

Streetcars will be slightly delayed; Dubose family takes step toward civil suit; state lawmakers want to drug test welfare recipients

Good morning all! Here’s the news today.

It looks as if the city’s streetcars will arrive a month or two behind schedule, though the delay probably won’t push back the transit project’s start date next fall. CAF USA, which is building the cars, anticipates needing at least another month past its Sept. 17 construction deadline to finish the vehicles and might need as long as November to finish. The delay isn’t entirely out of the blue — CAF relies on subcontractors whose provision of key components can run behind, and each vehicle must pass a number of safety and quality control tests that can push back delivery dates.

• The family of Samuel Dubose, who was shot and killed July 19 by University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing, has filed opening paperwork in what could become a wrongful death lawsuit over the incident. Audrey Dubose, Samuel’s mother, has asked a judge to make her executor of his estate so she can pursue the lawsuit on behalf of the estate. It’s the first step toward a civil suit, possibly against the university, Tensing himself or both. Dubose was unarmed when Tensing shot him during a routine traffic stop in Mount Auburn, about a half-mile from UC’s campus. Tensing stated he was dragged by Dubose’s Honda Accord and had no choice but to shoot him. Another officer corroborated his story in a police report. But Tensing’s body camera footage shows an entirely different story, revealing he shot Dubose in the head before his car started moving. UC fired Tensing and a grand jury has indicted him on murder charges. He’s out on $1 million bond. UC has also created a new position, the Vice President of Public Safety, in the wake of the shooting.

More details continue to trickle out about the case. Yesterday, the Hamilton County Coroner’s office revealed that a gin bottle Dubose handed to officer Tensing during the traffic stop did not contain alcohol, as originally reported, but instead held a fragrance mixture Dubose was using as an air freshener.

• Cincinnati Public Schools Superintendent Mary Ronan and representatives from other area districts met yesterday to kick off the Greater Cincinnati School Advocacy Network, a group of 41 local districts from Hamilton, Butler, Warren and Clermont Counties pushing back against state and federal mandates on teachers and education administration. The group’s meeting included calling out the increasing demands of high-stakes testing and data collection requirements among other unfunded requirements local districts say are overly onerous.

“Why does the state capitol need to know what class my child is in in third bell?” Ronan said at the meeting, according to the Cincinnati Enquirer. “We struggle with the million pieces of data they want.”

But some education advocates say state-level accountability efforts are necessary to ensure that students are being offered a quality education and that push back against some of the testing and data standards is an attempt to dodge responsibility for school performance. Ohio Gov. John Kasich has supported some of these state-wide and federal mandates, including the controversial Common Core federal education standards. He has argued that the expectations are about preparing U.S. students to compete in a global marketplace.

• Republican state lawmakers are mulling a bill that would require welfare recipients in Ohio to pass drug tests. If applicants for assistance fail that test, they would be required to attend rehab and would be barred from state assistance for six months. State Rep. Ron Maag, a Republican from Salem Township, says the goal is to keep state funds out of the hands of drug dealers and to get help for addicts. Those who fail drug tests could still receive state assistance for their children through a third party, Maag says. The bill would set aside $100,000 for treatment of those who fail drug tests and would start with a test run in a few select Ohio counties. Similar laws in other states have had a rather dismal track record. A Tennessee law requiring drug tests for welfare recipients found only 37 drug users out of the 16,017 people tested. The state spent thousands of dollars on the tests. Further, the tests might not be constitutional, and the Ohio chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union has threatened a lawsuit should the bill pass here.

• Here's something awful: the American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit against the Kenton County Sheriff's office over an incident in which a sheriff's deputy allegedly handcuffed two mentally disabled children at a Covington school, despite the fact the eight-year-old boy and nine-year-old girl did not pose a physical threat to anyone at the time. The ACLU filed the suit yesterday over the incident, which happened last year.

• Finally, will Gov. Kasich get to take the big stage and debate other GOP presidential hopefuls at the first official GOP primary debate in Cleveland Thursday? It’s coming down to the wire. Though Kasich has surged following his campaign announcement last month, he’s still small potatoes. He’s polling at about 3.5 percent and is hovering somewhere around ninth place in some polls. Fox News, which is hosting the debate, has said it will limit space in the event to the top 10 candidates. The network is expected to announce which 10 will get in later today. Kasich did attend a kind of warm-up candidate forum in New Hampshire yesterday along with 13 other contenders for the Republican nod. Not making the cut in Cleveland, however, would be somewhat humiliating for the home-state governor.

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