Morning News and Stuff

Planned Parenthood, Ohio AG fight over fetal tissue disposal; could city cut community development corp funding?; Bengals ask for study on possible stadium upgrades

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click to enlarge Paul Brown Stadium
Paul Brown Stadium

Good morning all. Hope your weekend was grand and not too spoiled by the disastrous Bengals loss/Andy Dalton injury Sunday, or, if you’re a UC basketball fan, their loss yet again to XU in the Crosstown Shootout. Luckily, I’m only vaguely aware of sports so I was just dandy. Anyway, news time.

Planned Parenthood of Ohio is firing back against Attorney General Mike DeWine’s allegations that the women’s health organization has been using a company that disposes of fetal remains in landfills. DeWine announced that Ohio will pursue civil penalties against Planned Parenthood over the allegations, which the AG says were discovered during an investigation into alleged sale of fetal remains for research. Donation of remains for research purposes is legal in other states, but illegal in Ohio, and the AG’s investigation found no evidence clinics in the state are engaged in the practice. However, DeWine announced that investigation did find three Planned Parenthood clinics, including one in Cincinnati, had contracted with a medical waste company that disposed of abortion remains in landfills, which he says violates a state law requiring such remains to be disposed of in a humane way. Planned Parenthood has called the allegations false and says the announcement is politically motivated. They’ve filed a federal lawsuit against the state for making the claims.

• A group of about 50 gun law reform advocates gathered in Northside Sunday to protest gun violence. National group Moms Demand Action organized the rally, which was one of many around the country aimed at highlighting the damage gun violence does to communities as well as pressuring politicians to pass tighter restrictions on the availability of firearms. One of the laws the group is protesting is House Bill 48, which would allow concealed carry permit holders to bring their guns into daycare centers, college campuses, churches and some government buildings. That bill passed the Ohio House and is now being considered by the state Senate.

• City of Cincinnati administration has proposed a 36-percent cut in funds to neighborhood community development corporations, and the heads of those organizations are crying foul. In an editorial that ran yesterday in the Cincinnati Enquirer, CDC Association of Greater Cincinnati head Patricia Garry said the proposed cuts would “cripple” CDCs. The non-profit groups work to create economic development and shore up housing and commercial space in the city’s neighborhoods. They include the Walnut Hills Redevelopment Corporation, the Avondale Comprehensive Development Corporation and a number of others, many of which signed the editorial by Gerry.

The groups rely on federal money from Community Development Block Grants and HOME programs that the city administers. Other programs receiving those funds from the city face much smaller cuts, Garry writes. Council’s Budget and Finance Committee will vote today on whether to slash funding to the CDCs. If it passes there, full council could vote on the cuts later this week. It's not the first time the city administration and Mayor John Cranley have sought to cut funds to CDCs, a move critics say is contradictory to his campaign promises to serve the city's neighborhoods first and foremost.

• Oh, yeah, back to the Bengals for a minute. The team is asking the county to commission a study from independent experts comparing Paul Brown Stadium to other NFL stadiums across the country and recommend possible upgrades. The county will most likely end up footing the bill for a good portion of any recommended improvements, much the way it paid $7.5 million of the $10 million it cost to put in a new scoreboard last year and $3 million for stadium-wide WiFi. Bengals officials say the upgrades could be necessary to keep the stadium competitive with other NFL facilities. The request for a study on upgrades is stipulated in the Bengals’ contract with the county, a deal that has been very controversial. Outside observers have called it one of the worst deals for taxpayers in sports stadium history. The $450 million stadium, approved by voters in 1996, has left the county struggling with debt and forced to shift funds from other revenue sources to cover the overall stadium deal.

• West Chester-based AK Steel has announced big layoffs at a Kentucky production facility, where as many as 620 workers will be out of work for an indefinite period of time. The move won’t affect all of the 900 employees at the company’s Ashland, Kentucky plant, but the news is still a big blow for the community, where AK is a major employer. The company says market conditions and low steel prices will force reductions in production, causing the layoffs. AK’s administrative offices are in West Chester Township, and the company also runs a large production facility in Middletown. That location has been hiring as recently as this summer.

• Finally, did Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s recent attacks on Donald Trump help Ohio’s big queso in his quest for the GOP prez nomination? Probably not. As the mainstream of the Republican Party begins to repudiate Trump over his statements about halting all Muslims from entering the U.S., among other inflammatory remarks, Kasich wants some credit. He’s been saying these things for weeks, by gosh, and people should recognize that he was early among GOP presidential primary contenders to call out the Donald. But it’s not really playing out that way, which leaves Kasich looking like he’s just crying out for attention.

“People are now beginning to wake up and say that this dividing is not acceptable, but I’ve been saying it for weeks, before anybody else even thought to pay attention to it,” Kasich said to reporters in South Carolina last week. “I’m glad I started it.”

Hm. Sometimes, though, being an early adopter doesn’t necessarily make you more popular. Kasich’s poll numbers haven’t really budged since his tangles with Trump, and more recent criticisms of the real estate magnate seem to skip over any mention of Kasich altogether. The Ohio guv’s attacks on Trump come as he works frantically to woo GOP voters, who so far have relegated him to single-digit returns at the polls.

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