Ohio Supreme Court Justice Pat DeWine 'Likes' Paul Pelosi Conspiracy Tweet but Claims It Was an Accident

A DeWine spokesperson blames the election "silly season" for the attention that the "like" is generating.

click to enlarge Ohio Supreme Court justice Pat DeWine is getting attention for liking a social media post regarding the assault of U.S. House speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband. - Photo: Ohio Supreme Court
Photo: Ohio Supreme Court
Ohio Supreme Court justice Pat DeWine is getting attention for liking a social media post regarding the assault of U.S. House speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband.

Ohio Supreme Court justice Pat DeWine said through a spokesperson that he "inadvertently" liked a tweet from Rep. Anthony Sabatini promoting conspiracy theories about the violent attack on Paul Pelosi, husband to the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, Democrat Nancy Pelosi.

DeWine, a Republican, unliked the tweet as soon as it was brought to his attention, a spokesperson told WSYX-TV in Columbus.

Chalking the attention up to "silly season," the spokesperson said, “Justice DeWine’s sole opinion and knowledge on this entire situation is that any attack on an elected official, especially Speaker Pelosi’s husband is terrible. It’s a crime if the facts are true.”

The statement was issued after the suspect, David DePape, was indicted on federal charges for attacking Paul Pelosi with a hammer. DePape told investigators that he wanted to take Nancy Pelosi hostage and break her kneecaps.

The tweet that DeWine liked – originally posted by a Republican state representative in Florida – said, "This Paul Pelosi situation is turning out to be VERY creepy—what are they hiding?"
DeWine, who grew up in Mount Lookout and previously has served as a local politician and judge, has otherwise unremarkable Twitter likes, showing support for all range of Cincinnati sports, various country musicians and fellow Ohio Republicans.

DeWine is the son of Gov. Mike DeWine and is one of three Ohio Supreme Court justices up for re-election in November. He had been accused of violating ethics during Ohio's battle for redrawn district maps.

A version of this story originally was published by CityBeat sister newspaper Cleveland Scene.

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