Suffragette

In the United States, most social/political movements tend to adopt non-violent means to further their causes, preferring to appeal to the goodwill of both adversaries and the undecided masses watching from the sidelines.

Nov 4, 2015 at 1:56 pm
click to enlarge Carey Mulligan in 'Suffragette'
Carey Mulligan in 'Suffragette'

In the United States, most social/political movements tend to adopt non-violent means to further their causes, preferring to appeal to the goodwill of both adversaries and the undecided masses watching from the sidelines. Director Sarah Gavron (Brick Lane), working from a script by Abi Morgan (Shame and The Iron Lady), presents a counterpoint from the early feminist movement in Britain. It was there where Maud Watts (Carey Mulligan) and others dared to pursue a more dangerous path by rallying working women to bypass the ineffective peaceful protests that had achieve little for a radicalized action that could result in huge personal losses. The film unites the obvious inspirational angle with sequences that would not be out of place in a more visceral thriller, and stands to gain from strong, buzz-worthy performances from Mulligan in the lead as well as Helena Bonham Carter and Meryl Streep in supporting roles. (Opens Friday at Mariemont Theatre) (PG-13) Not screened in time for review