Suffragette

In the United States, most social/political movements tend to adopt non-violent means to further their causes, preferring to appeal to the goodwill of both adversaries and the undecided masses watching from the sidelines.

click to enlarge Carey Mulligan in 'Suffragette'
Carey Mulligan in 'Suffragette'

In the United States, most social/political movements tend to adopt non-violent means to further their causes, preferring to appeal to the goodwill of both adversaries and the undecided masses watching from the sidelines. Director Sarah Gavron (Brick Lane), working from a script by Abi Morgan (Shame and The Iron Lady), presents a counterpoint from the early feminist movement in Britain. It was there where Maud Watts (Carey Mulligan) and others dared to pursue a more dangerous path by rallying working women to bypass the ineffective peaceful protests that had achieve little for a radicalized action that could result in huge personal losses. The film unites the obvious inspirational angle with sequences that would not be out of place in a more visceral thriller, and stands to gain from strong, buzz-worthy performances from Mulligan in the lead as well as Helena Bonham Carter and Meryl Streep in supporting roles. (Opens Friday at Mariemont Theatre) (PG-13) Not screened in time for review


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