25 Iconic Cincinnati Landmarks You Should Visit This Summer

The Queen City is made up of many quintessential and historical landmarks that make our city so unique. From flying pigs and iconic fountains to an over-century-old market, or more obscure fixtures like Covington's spaceship house or the Capitoline Wolf statue given to us by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini — these are a few Greater Cincinnati gems you should visit in order to call yourself a true Cincinnatian.
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Findlay Market
1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine
At more than 150 years old, Findlay Market is Ohio’s oldest continually operating public market and was named one of the top 10 markets in the world by Newsweek. Findlay Market has been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1972, and while it is fee to wander, they do offer a free 30-minute guided tour bi-monthly to introduce you to special market vendors and recount tales of the market’s history.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Findlay Market

1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine
At more than 150 years old, Findlay Market is Ohio’s oldest continually operating public market and was named one of the top 10 markets in the world by Newsweek. Findlay Market has been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1972, and while it is fee to wander, they do offer a free 30-minute guided tour bi-monthly to introduce you to special market vendors and recount tales of the market’s history.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption
1140 Madison Ave., Covington
Modeled after Notre Dame in Paris, the Gothic-style Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption on Madison Avenue features 26 Italian-carved gargoyle water spouts, flying buttresses, vaulted arches, columns and one of the world’s largest church stained-glass windows. A perfect substitute while the original Notre Dame is being rebuilt.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption

1140 Madison Ave., Covington
Modeled after Notre Dame in Paris, the Gothic-style Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption on Madison Avenue features 26 Italian-carved gargoyle water spouts, flying buttresses, vaulted arches, columns and one of the world’s largest church stained-glass windows. A perfect substitute while the original Notre Dame is being rebuilt.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Woolly Mammoth Statues
505 Gest St., Queensgate
A family of life-sized woolly mammoths can be found congregating outside of the Cincinnati Museum Center’s Geier Collections & Research Center on Gest Street. The mammoths mark the building, which is home to many archaeology and fossil collections, historical artifacts, pieces of art, several labs, offices and the Science Library. You can visit the center by appointment or scheduled tour. The mammoths used to call the former Natural History Museum home, located in the spot where WCPO now stands near the corner of Gilbert and Elsinore at the base of Mount Adams.
Photo via cincymuseum.org

Woolly Mammoth Statues

505 Gest St., Queensgate
A family of life-sized woolly mammoths can be found congregating outside of the Cincinnati Museum Center’s Geier Collections & Research Center on Gest Street. The mammoths mark the building, which is home to many archaeology and fossil collections, historical artifacts, pieces of art, several labs, offices and the Science Library. You can visit the center by appointment or scheduled tour. The mammoths used to call the former Natural History Museum home, located in the spot where WCPO now stands near the corner of Gilbert and Elsinore at the base of Mount Adams.
Photo via cincymuseum.org
John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge
Between Covington and downtown Cincinnati
Originally conceived as the Cincinnati-Covington Bridge, the Roebling Bridge officially opened to traffic, connecting the two riverfronts, on January 1, 1867. At the time, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world. For over 150 years — after much upkeep and refortification — the castle-like columns have stood tall on the Ohio River and have since become a trademark of the city’s skyline. Pedestrians are free to cross the bridge and admire the craftsmanship along the way to their destination.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge

Between Covington and downtown Cincinnati
Originally conceived as the Cincinnati-Covington Bridge, the Roebling Bridge officially opened to traffic, connecting the two riverfronts, on January 1, 1867. At the time, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world. For over 150 years — after much upkeep and refortification — the castle-like columns have stood tall on the Ohio River and have since become a trademark of the city’s skyline. Pedestrians are free to cross the bridge and admire the craftsmanship along the way to their destination.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
The Spaceship House
222 Wright St., Covington
In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Finnish architect Matti Suuronen designed less than 100 Futuro houses, or flying saucer-esue homes — and Covington has one of them. It was purchased in 1973 by Rob Detzel, who first saw it in an issue of Family Circle. He made arrangements for its display at a home and garden show, then took it on a tour of sorts; in 1987, it landed (er, it was delivered) to its current location. The community embraces its presence and the Futuro House has even been included in a mural titled "Love the Cov" by Jarrod Becker, on the wall at Kroger’s Covington location. In 2013, Covington's Mayor Sherry Carran declared Nov. 2 — the 40th anniversary to its purchase by Detzel — "Futuro House Day," officially naming the property it is on "Area 89." Note: This is a private residence.
Photo via Google Street View

The Spaceship House

222 Wright St., Covington
In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Finnish architect Matti Suuronen designed less than 100 Futuro houses, or flying saucer-esue homes — and Covington has one of them. It was purchased in 1973 by Rob Detzel, who first saw it in an issue of Family Circle. He made arrangements for its display at a home and garden show, then took it on a tour of sorts; in 1987, it landed (er, it was delivered) to its current location. The community embraces its presence and the Futuro House has even been included in a mural titled "Love the Cov" by Jarrod Becker, on the wall at Kroger’s Covington location. In 2013, Covington's Mayor Sherry Carran declared Nov. 2 — the 40th anniversary to its purchase by Detzel — "Futuro House Day," officially naming the property it is on "Area 89." Note: This is a private residence.
Photo via Google Street View
Duke Energy Convention Center’s Cincinnati Sign
525 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine
On the west-facing side of downtown’s Duke Energy Convention Center stretches an illuminated “Cincinnati” sign. Designed by nonprofit design and experience team SEGD, the iconic sign welcomes you into the Queen City and can be admired from several Cincinnati overlooks with the skyline as a beautiful backdrop. 
Photo via segd.org

Duke Energy Convention Center’s Cincinnati Sign

525 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine
On the west-facing side of downtown’s Duke Energy Convention Center stretches an illuminated “Cincinnati” sign. Designed by nonprofit design and experience team SEGD, the iconic sign welcomes you into the Queen City and can be admired from several Cincinnati overlooks with the skyline as a beautiful backdrop.
Photo via segd.org
The Mushroom House
3331 Erie Ave., Hyde Park
Architect Terry Brown was a University of Cincinnati professor of architecture and interior design, but to most in our region he’s known as the guy behind Hyde Park’s famed "Mushroom House." Guests at street level will notice a winding entry staircase and a misshapen exterior constructed of metal, glass, ceramic and warped wood shingles, suggesting a fairy tale or bizarre, otherworld-esue appearance that looks like a very large mushroom. The one-bedroom, one-bath, 1,260-square-foot structure was built by Brown from 1992 to 2006, and served as his second residence until his death in 2008.
Photo via Zillow listing

The Mushroom House

3331 Erie Ave., Hyde Park
Architect Terry Brown was a University of Cincinnati professor of architecture and interior design, but to most in our region he’s known as the guy behind Hyde Park’s famed "Mushroom House." Guests at street level will notice a winding entry staircase and a misshapen exterior constructed of metal, glass, ceramic and warped wood shingles, suggesting a fairy tale or bizarre, otherworld-esue appearance that looks like a very large mushroom. The one-bedroom, one-bath, 1,260-square-foot structure was built by Brown from 1992 to 2006, and served as his second residence until his death in 2008.
Photo via Zillow listing
The Betts House
416 Clark St., West End
The Betts House is the oldest brick home in Ohio and the oldest residential building in Cincinnati. The original two-room colonial-style home was built by William and Phebe Betts in 1804, who passed down the home through their relatives for decades. The historic home was acquired by the National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Ohio in 1994, where they have since operated guided tours and presentations about the home’s owners, its history and early 19th century architecture.
Photo via facebook.com/thebettshouse

The Betts House

416 Clark St., West End
The Betts House is the oldest brick home in Ohio and the oldest residential building in Cincinnati. The original two-room colonial-style home was built by William and Phebe Betts in 1804, who passed down the home through their relatives for decades. The historic home was acquired by the National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Ohio in 1994, where they have since operated guided tours and presentations about the home’s owners, its history and early 19th century architecture.
Photo via facebook.com/thebettshouse
Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County's Book Fountain
800 Vine St., Downtown
Otherwise known as "The Amelia Valerio Weinberg Memorial Fountain," the book fountain features a stack of ceramic books with water flowing between them, "representing the free flow of information and ideas through the printed word," according to cincinnatilibrary.org. The fountain was designed by former Cincinnati artist Michael Frasca and was created thanks to a bequest from Mrs. Weinberg.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County's Book Fountain

800 Vine St., Downtown
Otherwise known as "The Amelia Valerio Weinberg Memorial Fountain," the book fountain features a stack of ceramic books with water flowing between them, "representing the free flow of information and ideas through the printed word," according to cincinnatilibrary.org. The fountain was designed by former Cincinnati artist Michael Frasca and was created thanks to a bequest from Mrs. Weinberg.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Music Hall
1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine
Completed in 1878, the Venetian Gothic Music Hall houses a concert theater — Springer Auditorium — which serves as home for the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Cincinnati Opera and the May Festival Chorus, among other local performing arts organizations. The National Historic Landmark is built over a pauper’s cemetery and is rumored to be one of the most haunted buildings in America. The Society for the Preservation of Music Hall hosts "Beyond the Bricks" walking tours for a fee. Also keep an eye out for haunted tours. 
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Music Hall

1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine
Completed in 1878, the Venetian Gothic Music Hall houses a concert theater — Springer Auditorium — which serves as home for the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Cincinnati Opera and the May Festival Chorus, among other local performing arts organizations. The National Historic Landmark is built over a pauper’s cemetery and is rumored to be one of the most haunted buildings in America. The Society for the Preservation of Music Hall hosts "Beyond the Bricks" walking tours for a fee. Also keep an eye out for haunted tours.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger