October 10, 2019

Inside Architects of Air's Alienesque Luminarium 'Dodecalis'

In 2017, Washington Park played host to Architects of Air's “Katena,” an inflated, palace-like “luminarium” that glowed in vivid color. As BLINK’s only ticketed event (it cost $5), it also proved to be one of the most popular. Architects of Air returns to BLINK, this time for the world premiere of the new luminarium “Dodecalis.” Like its predecessor, Architects of Air writes on its website that “Dodecalis” is inspired by “natural forms, geometric solids (and) Islamic and Gothic architecture.” Outside, its whimsical frame and rounded peaks strike wonder. Inside, alienesque designs unfold in cavernous alcoves. There are no bright, flashing lights, but instead a soft, saturated glow and a contemplative soundscape. With each turn, another room is revealed. Though you could likely spend hours in the calming space, Organizers say that visitors should spend about 20 minutes in "Dodecalis" so that everyone in line — if it's anything like "Katena," long lines are a given — can experience its wonder. (Admission is $10; $5 for kids under 10 and free for those 2 and under.)
Photos by Mackenzie Manley
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“When you look at what we’ve pulled off here, and will pull off again, it would be a no-brainer for any artist or creative to want to launch something big and bold at BLINK,” says Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber President Jill Meyer, citing the creativity, care and innovation of the people who call the region home.
Mackenzie Manley
“When you look at what we’ve pulled off here, and will pull off again, it would be a no-brainer for any artist or creative to want to launch something big and bold at BLINK,” says Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber President Jill Meyer, citing the creativity, care and innovation of the people who call the region home.
Housed in Washington Park, as you walk toward the civic lawn, the structure's whimsical peaks and rounded arches can be seen from afar.
Mackenzie Manley
Housed in Washington Park, as you walk toward the civic lawn, the structure's whimsical peaks and rounded arches can be seen from afar.
Glowy saturated colors mesh with a lulling ambient soundtrack in Architect of Air's luminarium "Dodecalis".
Mackenzie Manley
Glowy saturated colors mesh with a lulling ambient soundtrack in Architect of Air's luminarium "Dodecalis".
With each turn comes a different room, each imbued with its own mood and aesthetic.
Mackenzie Manley
With each turn comes a different room, each imbued with its own mood and aesthetic.
Organizers suggest that, in order for everyone in line to see "Dodecalis," visitors should spend about 20 minutes in the space.
Mackenzie Manley
Organizers suggest that, in order for everyone in line to see "Dodecalis," visitors should spend about 20 minutes in the space.
Another view of the exterior of "Dodecalis".
Mackenzie Manley
Another view of the exterior of "Dodecalis".
Floral-like lines crawl up rounded walls.
Mackenzie Manley
Floral-like lines crawl up rounded walls.
The luminarium's hallways are just as fascinating, provided a meeting spot for color and sound.
Mackenzie Manley
The luminarium's hallways are just as fascinating, provided a meeting spot for color and sound.
Long lines for "Dodecalis" are a given, but if it's anything like "Katena" — the Architects of Air luminarium that took over Washington Park last year — the rewards will be well worth the wait.
Mackenzie Manley
Long lines for "Dodecalis" are a given, but if it's anything like "Katena" — the Architects of Air luminarium that took over Washington Park last year — the rewards will be well worth the wait.
Seriously: lay down and peer up. In one room, a flower blooms on the ceiling.
Mackenzie Manley
Seriously: lay down and peer up. In one room, a flower blooms on the ceiling.