Cincinnati Women's March 2020 Scheduled

Cincinnati will once again join other cities across the country in hosting a women's march protesting gender-based inequities and promoting progressive causes related to issues like economic justice and environmental stewardship.

Attendees at the 2017 Cincinnati Women's March - Nick Swartsell
Nick Swartsell
Attendees at the 2017 Cincinnati Women's March

Cincinnati will once again join other cities across the country in hosting a women's march protesting gender-based inequities and promoting progressive causes related to issues like economic justice and environmental stewardship.

In a news release, organizers with United We Stand Cincinnati say the 2020 Cincinnati Women's March and rally will take place Jan. 18 from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Sawyer Point Park downtown. After remarks from local activists and leaders, a one-mile march will wind through downtown. After the march, more speakers will address attendees. 

The event will include a performance by progressive choir MUSE, information tables for various nonprofits and activist groups and food trucks. 

"While the Women’s March was a one-day event, the movement it sparked has gained momentum, fueled by anti-women legislation, income inequality and a series of high-profile sexual abuse and harassment cases," a news release from United We Stand Cincinnati reads. "Thousands of #MeToo stories have flooded social media and traditional media and we’ve seen dozens of investigations, firings, and resignations of powerful men finally facing consequences for their anti-woman behavior."

The original Women's March was held in January 2017 in Washington, D.C. to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump, who has received heated criticism for his remarks about women, including some seeming to condone sexual assault. Local organizers also helped put together a Cincinnati iteration of the march that year and in 2018. Both of those events drew roughly 14,000 people, organizers say.

The event has seen some controversy and schisms among activist groups both nationally and locally in the past two years, but organizers have vowed to continue the march. Despite an earlier cancellation, another Cincinnati event last year organized by local socialist groups and other activists drew hundreds to Sawyer Point.




 


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