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Greet Bush NoisilyUnited for Peace and Justice, the folks who helped organize protests of the Republican National Convention in New York, now encourage convergence on Washington, D.C. to mark Presi

Greet Bush Noisily

United for Peace and Justice, the folks who helped organize protests of the Republican National Convention in New York, now encourage convergence on Washington, D.C. to mark President Bush's Jan. 20 inauguration. Two groups are organizing creative, powerful protest activities: the DC Anti-War Network (www.dawndc.net) and Turn Your Back on Bush (www.turnyourbackonbush.org). They also urge those who can't attend to organize local protest or educational events Jan. 20 and list them on the UFPJ calendar at www.unitedforpeaceandjustice.org/events.

Billionaires Celebrate their Win

Billionaires for Bush, unsatisfied with their man's narrow win, plan street action and a Billionaires Ball on Inauguration Day, followed by a convergence disguised in "angry liberal attire" and ending three days later with sightseeing in billionaire garb. RSVP to [email protected]. Billionaires are also holding hotel rooms at reasonable rates; email [email protected].

Drums to Remind the Nation

Take a crazy idea, like welcoming Bush 43 to his second stint as commander in chief by simulating the heartbeats of those that beat no longer. Try to find 1,000 drummers to symbolize the (now more than) 1,000 American soldiers killed in Iraq. Post your crazy idea on the Web. Be amazed when not one but 20 states take up the "1,000 Drums for Peace" banner. "People could meet in drum circles, at someone's home, in city parks, in front of city halls or stand alone on the top of the hill," writes organizer Jerry Moody. The drumming coincides with the oath of office Jan. 20. State leaders are needed to coordinate drum circles, direct lonely drummers, act as media contacts and serve on the 1,000 Drums board. Contact Moody at [email protected] to find out more.

Peace Group Rebuilds

The Coalition for Peace With Iraq (CPWI) is organizing to help rebuild the anti-war movement — before the Bush regime's next military venture. CPWI meets from 4-6 p.m. the first and third Sundays of each month at Mt. Auburn Presbyterian Church.

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