FRINGE 2019 CRITIC'S PICK: 'My Geriatric Uterus'

Lormarev Jones boldly challenges audiences to call out the hypocrisy of American society seeking to question a woman's right to choose

click to enlarge "My Geriatric Uterus" - Provided by Cincinnati Fringe Festival
Provided by Cincinnati Fringe Festival
"My Geriatric Uterus"

CRITIC'S PICK

As the war on a woman’s right to choose continues to divide the country, one woman is taking on the fight in a hilarious, yet soul-stirring performance as she approaches her mid-thirties. In a span of 60 minutes, Cincinnati artist and creator Lormarev Jones boldly challenges audiences to call out the hypocrisy of American society seeking to measure the worth of a woman if she hasn't produced offspring by her mid-thirties in My Geriatric Uterus from Aggressive Curl Pattern Productions.

If I knew that I would spend a Saturday night in my mid-thirties intentionally singing and laughing about the overall ills of being a woman, my menstrual flow and self-reflecting on my own empty uterus in a room full of strangers, I would probably be balled up in a corner right now questioning my life choices.  However, through her comedic SNL-like performance, Jones creates a community where women in the audience feel seen and more importantly, respected.

In her dual role as a student-loan-debt-ridden actress and Facetious Jones — her opinionated, yet underutilized uterus with an uncanny Italian accent — Jones brazenly takes on the status quo by giving voice and agency to millions of women feeling the pressure to have a child, whether they want to or not.

Jones' creative use of puppets and interactive props coupled with the hilarious original musical selections of  Christopher Wood draw you in; while there are points in the show that lag due to scene changes, Jones effortlessly weaves in anecdotes and audience participation to keep attendees engaged. If there is a way I could have a side production featuring the life and trials of Facetious Jones, I would order my ticket today. The witty uterus is a high point in the production as it continually laments about the lack of success it is getting due to the unwillingness of its owner to dive head first into motherhood.

About midway through the performance, you are hit with a gut punch: Jones shares audience opinions on why they have delayed their trip to motherhood. Some answers given include wanting the freedom to travel, climate change, general anxiety about keeping children safe, and a theory that childhood innocence does not seem the same anymore. This last reason sparks a deep and very necessary introspective monologue from Jones about the intersectionality of being black and a woman in America. Jones masterfully weaves in the additional trials and tribulations that she, as a black woman, would face raising a black child in a country where they aren't afforded the opportunity to have a childhood and make mistakes like their counterparts. It was during this tense five minutes or so that the production was elevated and the pain, worry, and fear of many African-American women are seen through the eyes of Jones.

Let's face it, being a woman in America these days is tough. While we battle it out monthly with our own anatomy, we are also forced into war with our family, friends, and strangers about what is best for our lives. All we want is a little liberation — to make our own choices. As the show's press release puts it: If you have a uterus, wish to have a uterus or ever loved someone with a uterus, then My Geriatric Uterus is a must see.

It will not only entertain you but challenge you to trust women.


The Cincinnati Fringe Festival runs through June 15. Find showtimes, tickets and more info here. Check out more reviews from our CityBeat team here. For a comprehensive list click here




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