These International Eateries Are Must-Visit Cincinnati Culinary Gems

Uthapam, tete du cochon, ceviche, kielbasa, tajine, ban chan, injera, katsu sando, fatayer, sesos tacos — these are just some of the delicious eats served up by Cincinnati’s many authentic international restaurants. Want to expand both your vocabulary and culinary horizons (and, perhaps, your waistline)? Begin your edible exploration with these CityBeat favorites. *Note: This is obviously not a comprehensive list of every delicious international dining destination in the city.    
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Fortune Noodle House
349 Calhoun St., Clifton
This Clifton eatery specializes in hand-pulled noodles, the star of its menu. In a soup, the noodles soak up the broth but stay chewy, a quality unique to fresh homemade noodles. The pan-fried dishes also don’t dissapoint: try the shredded pork noodle for a well-balanced, flavorful meal, or check out some of the other favorites.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Fortune Noodle House

349 Calhoun St., Clifton
This Clifton eatery specializes in hand-pulled noodles, the star of its menu. In a soup, the noodles soak up the broth but stay chewy, a quality unique to fresh homemade noodles. The pan-fried dishes also don’t dissapoint: try the shredded pork noodle for a well-balanced, flavorful meal, or check out some of the other favorites.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Uncle Yip’s
10736 Reading Road, Evendale
Uncle Yip’s is strip-mall Chinese food at its finest, with authentic (yes, that word gets tossed around a lot, but this is the real deal) Cantonese, Hunan and Sichuan cuisine. At dinner, the clientele is made up of families and friends gathered around tables sharing dishes like ginger and green onion lobster, rock salt squid and Peking duck. It’s like being transported to Hong Kong’s Temple Street Night Market in the Cincy suburbs. Try the weekend dim sum service, complete with rolling carts featuring baskets full of different little steamed or fried delights.
Photo: Facebook.com/UncleYips

Uncle Yip’s

10736 Reading Road, Evendale
Uncle Yip’s is strip-mall Chinese food at its finest, with authentic (yes, that word gets tossed around a lot, but this is the real deal) Cantonese, Hunan and Sichuan cuisine. At dinner, the clientele is made up of families and friends gathered around tables sharing dishes like ginger and green onion lobster, rock salt squid and Peking duck. It’s like being transported to Hong Kong’s Temple Street Night Market in the Cincy suburbs. Try the weekend dim sum service, complete with rolling carts featuring baskets full of different little steamed or fried delights.
Photo: Facebook.com/UncleYips
Arrechisimo
8100 Blue Ash Road, Deer Park
Arrechissimo is Venezuelan slang for “spectacular.” Located in the tiny, working-class neighborhood of Deer Park, it offers a one-page menu of Venezuela's most beloved signature dishes. Though more than half of Arrechissimo's menu involves fried food, dinner entrées and some side dishes offer a respite from any oil overload.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Arrechisimo

8100 Blue Ash Road, Deer Park
Arrechissimo is Venezuelan slang for “spectacular.” Located in the tiny, working-class neighborhood of Deer Park, it offers a one-page menu of Venezuela's most beloved signature dishes. Though more than half of Arrechissimo's menu involves fried food, dinner entrées and some side dishes offer a respite from any oil overload.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Baladi Restaurant and Bakery
3307 Clifton Ave., Clifton
This Syrian restaurant offers a broad menu of Arabic eats: there’s hummus, falafel, kebabs and gyros, but branch out and try something you won’t find on other Middle Eastern-leaning menus, like foul (fava beans, olive oil and lemon juice) or fatayir (a “cheese boat” baked in handmade dough). Do yourself a favor and save room for a handmade dessert, like kunafa (filo dough, ricotta cheese and cream) or the icy mint lemonade.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Baladi Restaurant and Bakery

3307 Clifton Ave., Clifton
This Syrian restaurant offers a broad menu of Arabic eats: there’s hummus, falafel, kebabs and gyros, but branch out and try something you won’t find on other Middle Eastern-leaning menus, like foul (fava beans, olive oil and lemon juice) or fatayir (a “cheese boat” baked in handmade dough). Do yourself a favor and save room for a handmade dessert, like kunafa (filo dough, ricotta cheese and cream) or the icy mint lemonade.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
La Mexicana
642 Monmouth St., Newport
Home of some of the city’s best tacos: tacos al pastor with deliciously marinated pork shoulder, barbacoa, carne asada, lengua (tongue) and sesos (brains; they wash down perfectly with a cerveza). For vegetarians, wide-ranging fillings include seasoned pumpkin flower, corn truffle, hongos, beans and queso fresco. This inexpensive and authentic menu has been known to incite cravings after as little as one visit.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

La Mexicana

642 Monmouth St., Newport
Home of some of the city’s best tacos: tacos al pastor with deliciously marinated pork shoulder, barbacoa, carne asada, lengua (tongue) and sesos (brains; they wash down perfectly with a cerveza). For vegetarians, wide-ranging fillings include seasoned pumpkin flower, corn truffle, hongos, beans and queso fresco. This inexpensive and authentic menu has been known to incite cravings after as little as one visit.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Le’s Pho and Sandwiches
3 E Court St., Downtown
This unassuming spot has a simple yet extensive menu, offering both traditional Vietnamese dishes as well as those that cater to less adventurous palates. Try the banh mi, a traditional Vietnamese sandwich complete with your choice of chicken, beef, pork, teriyaki or Dac Biet (a hearty combination of pork and pâté), topped with pickled carrot, onion, cilantro, jalapeño and just the right amount of mayonnaise. The eatery closed this spring to welcome a tiny new addition to the family, but will be reopening soon.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Le’s Pho and Sandwiches

3 E Court St., Downtown
This unassuming spot has a simple yet extensive menu, offering both traditional Vietnamese dishes as well as those that cater to less adventurous palates. Try the banh mi, a traditional Vietnamese sandwich complete with your choice of chicken, beef, pork, teriyaki or Dac Biet (a hearty combination of pork and pâté), topped with pickled carrot, onion, cilantro, jalapeño and just the right amount of mayonnaise. The eatery closed this spring to welcome a tiny new addition to the family, but will be reopening soon.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Ando Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar
5889 Pfeiffer Road, Blue Ash
Sushi might be everywhere now, but chef Ken Ando knows how to do it right. The dining room includes a 10-seat sushi bar, which is the perfect place to watch Ando work his magic on the freshest of fish, sourced directly from Japan and Taiwan.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Ando Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar

5889 Pfeiffer Road, Blue Ash
Sushi might be everywhere now, but chef Ken Ando knows how to do it right. The dining room includes a 10-seat sushi bar, which is the perfect place to watch Ando work his magic on the freshest of fish, sourced directly from Japan and Taiwan.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger
Elephant Walk Injera & Curry House
170 W McMillan St., Clifton
Elephant Walk Injera & Curry House boasts a large, double-sided menu — Northern Indian on one side, traditional Ethiopian on the other. But what’s really awesome is the daily lunch buffet. It has both Ethiopian and Indian dishes so you can sample all you can eat of both cuisines and carbo load on both naan and injera, each country's unique take on bread with which to scoop up your meal.
Photo: Khoi Nguyen

Elephant Walk Injera & Curry House

170 W McMillan St., Clifton
Elephant Walk Injera & Curry House boasts a large, double-sided menu — Northern Indian on one side, traditional Ethiopian on the other. But what’s really awesome is the daily lunch buffet. It has both Ethiopian and Indian dishes so you can sample all you can eat of both cuisines and carbo load on both naan and injera, each country's unique take on bread with which to scoop up your meal.
Photo: Khoi Nguyen
Chako Bakery
611 Main St., Covington
This Covington bakery serves up delicious baked goods with omotenashi, a word for Japan’s unique sense of hospitality. In addition to baked staples like bread and cookies, try Chako's Japanese sandwiches like the katsu sando, a pork favorite you'll have to be quick to get — a limited amount are made each day — or the popular, bright green matcha roll. 
Photo: Mesa Serikali

Chako Bakery

611 Main St., Covington
This Covington bakery serves up delicious baked goods with omotenashi, a word for Japan’s unique sense of hospitality. In addition to baked staples like bread and cookies, try Chako's Japanese sandwiches like the katsu sando, a pork favorite you'll have to be quick to get — a limited amount are made each day — or the popular, bright green matcha roll.
Photo: Mesa Serikali
Bridges Nepali Cuisine
4165 Hamilton Ave., Northside
The restaurant name — Bridges — encourages diners to use food as a means of connecting to new cultures. owner Ashak Chipalu creates Nepalese food using his mother's recipes. The dishes are rich with spices — like ginger, garlic, cumin, chili pepper and cilantro — that elevate the simple ingredients like chicken, potato, lentils and cauliflower. In addition to its bowls and curries, it’s known for its unique and wide-ranging samosa selection, as well as momos aka Nepalese dumplings.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Bridges Nepali Cuisine

4165 Hamilton Ave., Northside
The restaurant name — Bridges — encourages diners to use food as a means of connecting to new cultures. owner Ashak Chipalu creates Nepalese food using his mother's recipes. The dishes are rich with spices — like ginger, garlic, cumin, chili pepper and cilantro — that elevate the simple ingredients like chicken, potato, lentils and cauliflower. In addition to its bowls and curries, it’s known for its unique and wide-ranging samosa selection, as well as momos aka Nepalese dumplings.
Photo: Hailey Bollinger